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FSM
08-20-2007, 02:19 PM
An interesting article in the Chicago Sun Time: http://www.suntimes.com/sports/preps/51 ... 20.article (http://www.suntimes.com/sports/preps/516825,CST-SPT-socc20.article)

This is probably more of an issue in Illinois since they have 3 clubs who will be part of the acdemy system, while Mass. only one at the present time, but that could change and also include girls at some future date.

IHSA has some Academic issues

August 20, 2007
BY JOE TROST
For years, many purists have said the Illinois High School Association's inability to adjust to changing times eventually would turn high school soccer into a recreational sport.
While it hasn't quite reached that point, there's little doubt next year will be interesting for high school soccer and its decision-makers within the IHSA membership.

U.S. Soccer has officially announced the calendar for the nationwide Development Academy, which features 64 clubs throughout the country taking part in a revolutionary new program. The 64 teams will be divided into eight conferences, each made up of eight teams based largely on geographic proximity.

Teams will play approximately 30 games during an eight-month season, with the winner of each conference playing in the Academy finals at the Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif.

The Development Academy kicks off in September with a two-day orientation in Chicago. The first games of the inaugural season will begin during the first week of October. Teams will compete in three types of game weekends -- individual conference games, travel-partner weekends and showcase weekends -- to provide players with the optimum balance of playing rhythm, economy of travel and exposure to scouts.

''The Development Academy has been implemented to shift the focus of the young elite player toward a meaningful training and competition model, with the U.S. Soccer Federation taking the initiative to extend its national-team program into the daily environment of the elite player,'' U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati said. ''The response thus far has been unprecedented for a youth initiative.''

Unlike other states, the IHSA prohibits players from competing with their club teams during the high school season. The area's two top clubs -- the Chicago Magic and Sockers FC -- and the Chicago Fire PDA are three of the programs in the Mid-America Conference, which also features teams from Wisconsin, Indiana and Missouri and one of the U.S. men's national teams.

The Magic, Sockers FC and Fire will send teams made up of under-15/16 and under-17/18 players. The Magic, however, is the only program covering all costs for its players.

In total, more than 2,000 players nationwide are expected to take part in the Development Academy beginning later this fall.

''It is highly unlikely our membership would be supportive of our student-athletes playing with club and high school teams at the same time,'' IHSA executive director Marty Hickman said. ''It's too bad for those kids that aren't going to get a chance to play high school soccer.

''This new program is going to set expectations for these kids that they're not going to be able to meet. These kids in the program are going to start to believe they're going to be future Division I or professional players. Clearly this is their business, and we're not going to get involved in it. I do know we're going to have plenty of kids who have fun playing high school soccer. We'd love to have every student play high school, but that's up to them.''

08-20-2007, 03:02 PM
According to the US Soccer web site, high school soccer is ok.

Do the MIAA rules prevent playing an Academy game on a weekend so long as you do not miss a high school practice or game?

Also, the initial information was that the seasons would be organized around the high school schedules for each Region. Has that changed?

08-20-2007, 03:08 PM
According to the US Soccer web site, high school soccer is ok.

Do the MIAA rules prevent playing an Academy game on a weekend so long as you do not miss a high school practice or game?

Also, the initial information was that the seasons would be organized around the high school schedules for each Region. Has that changed?

Unless those HS coaches call for a meeting or practice over the weekend. It's been done before and stopped kids from doing things with their club teams.

Blue Devil
08-20-2007, 03:12 PM
I have also seen it done the other way where a coach will make a practice optional to prevent an MIAA violation by one of their players

Cujo
08-20-2007, 03:12 PM
I think the statement that removing the top 40 or so players from the HS scene will turn HS into a recreational sport is a gross insult to the scores of fine players that compete at the HS level in every state. Some of the top players will choose to play HS - others will forego the experience in pursuit of something greater in the future. There is a price to paid for reaching the highest level of play and achievement. Ricky DiPietro of the NY Islanders is a great example. He never played HS in Winthrop, never played in Hockey East, and left youth hockey at 13 for a hockey academy in Michigan. It worked out great for him. He is a millionaire and one of the premier goalies in the world. He is also a stranger in his hometown. For every DiPietro there are another 20 goalies who make the same sacrifice but never make it. The Globe ran an article about one such player several weeks ago who was in his late 20's and still struggling in the lower minors. While it is great to go for the brass ring it is important to realize that there is a price that comes with it.

08-20-2007, 03:20 PM
Cujo - I don't disagree with your point, but DiPietro played at BU.

Very much like the basketball players who go for one year.


Collegiate career
DiPietro played one season (1999-2000) with Boston University in the NCAA's Hockey East. In that one year, DiPietro was named to the All-Rookie Team, named Second Team All-Hockey East, awarded the team's Co-MVP and was named Hockey East's Rookie of the Year. In addition, Dipetro nearly set the NCAA record for most saves in a game when he stopped 77 out of 80 shots in a 3-2 quadruple overtime loss to St. Lawrence during the NCAA regional final (record is 78 and held by D. Greenlaw). In his one and only Beanpot Tournament, DiPietro was named MVP and won the Eberly Trophy awarded to the tournament's top goaltender.

08-20-2007, 03:23 PM
I have also seen it done the other way where a coach will make a practice optional to prevent an MIAA violation by one of their players

That's worth highlighting, because there are a number of coaches who have gone the extra mile to help students work around the MIAA. While the few that use the MIAA to control players for their own entertainment are still there, their numbers are fewer each year.

FSM
08-20-2007, 04:10 PM
According to the US Soccer web site, high school soccer is ok.

Do the MIAA rules prevent playing an Academy game on a weekend so long as you do not miss a high school practice or game?

I believe they do or at least did. There was the case of a nationally ranked swimmer attending an Olympic qualifying meet. Because it was an Olympic qualifier, under MIAA rules, she could go, but she had to request a waiver from HS events 1 month in advance. Originally there was no conflict between the meet and the HS schedule; however, due to bad weather a HS meet was rescheduled and then rescheduled again which did cause a conflict. If she went to the qualifier then she would not have been able to go to the State meet because she had not applied for a waiver in advance as required. Initially MIAA told the swimmer "Too bad", but her parents sued MIAA and the judge basically said to the MIAA "What wrong with you people?" There may have been some changes to the rule as a result of this case, but I can't say what they may have been.

I am still under the impression that the MIAA thinks the HS team comes first and would be unlikely to agree to a player missing a HS event for the academy. I definitely know that in Illinois there is a rule that does not allow HS players to play club in any way, shape or form during the HS season. Some of the clubs already had in place an alternative to high school program, so I haven't heard how big an impact the academies will have.

Also, the initial information was that the seasons would be organized around the high school schedules for each Region. Has that changed?

The big problem is that different states have different high school seasons. Some play in the fall, some in the winter and some in the spring. Although it shouldn't be a problem for New England and New York, I haven't heard how the academies are going to resolve this issue in other parts of the country.

MASoccer
08-20-2007, 05:34 PM
I have also seen it done the other way where a coach will make a practice optional to prevent an MIAA violation by one of their players

Just because a coach makes a practice "optional" can still be determined to be in violation of the bona fide team rule. The bona fide team rule is considered to be very strict and if violators are caught (coaches and/ or players) the consequences can be extremely punitive. I know of a runner from Ludlow High School who ws given permission by her coach to leave early from a track meet (her three events were completed) so she could attend her club team's state qualifier. She was reported to the MIAA and was banned from competing for the remainder of the high school season. This young lady was a very gifted runner who early on had many college prospects. She ended up at a school with a decent track program, but struggled with the recruiting process because of her lack of high school performance times and the imposed sanctioning by the MIAA. I highly doubt that MIAA is going to be any less lenient to Academy particpants.

Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

08-20-2007, 05:49 PM
I have also seen it done the other way where a coach will make a practice optional to prevent an MIAA violation by one of their players

Just because a coach makes a practice "optional" can still be determined to be in violation of the bona fide team rule. The bona fide team rule is considered to be very strict and if violators are caught (coaches and/ or players) the consequences can be extremely punitive. I know of a runner from Ludlow High School who ws given permission by her coach to leave early from a track meet (her three events were completed) so she could attend her club team's state qualifier. She was reported to the MIAA and was banned from competing for the remainder of the high school season. This young lady was a very gifted runner who early on had many college prospects. She ended up at a school with a decent track program, but struggled with the recruiting process because of her lack of high school performance times and the imposed sanctioning by the MIAA. I highly doubt that MIAA is going to be any less lenient to Academy particpants.

Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

Is the MIAA really that unreasonable? The person who decided to report the violation must be a very evil person.

From a previous thread, a poster once asked if the MIAA has rules against a parent coaching a Varsity team with his/her son/daughter on the team. Does the MIAA forbid it since it does not allow coaching/contact with a player during the offseason. It is pretty hard to avoid that if it's your own child. My fear is that based upon the above, I can see the MIAA enforcing that as well. It sounds like there is some common sense lacking in that org.

MASoccer
08-20-2007, 05:59 PM
Is the MIAA really that unreasonable? The person who decided to report the violation must be a very evil person.

From a previous thread, a poster once asked if the MIAA has rules against a parent coaching a Varsity team with his/her son/daughter on the team. Does the MIAA forbid it since it does not allow coaching/contact with a player during the offseason. It is pretty hard to avoid that if it's your own child. My fear is that based upon the above, I can see the MIAA enforcing that as well. It sounds like there is some common sense lacking in that org.

I believe Cujo responded to this in another thread since he has been living this scenario. It is my understanding that unless you are coaching more than 50% of the high school team in the off season, you are not in violation. There are many parents that coach their children in high school and club. As long as they are not coaching the majority of their high school team players it is fine.

MASoccer
08-20-2007, 06:12 PM
Is the MIAA really that unreasonable? The person who decided to report the violation must be a very evil person.


I believe they are. The Ludlow girl I had commented about could have had her entire world crash around her because of the rigidity of their rules. As far as who reported it, many rumors were circulated but nothing was substantiated.

Blue Devil
08-20-2007, 06:53 PM
I have also seen it done the other way where a coach will make a practice optional to prevent an MIAA violation by one of their players

Just because a coach makes a practice "optional" can still be determined to be in violation of the bona fide team rule. The bona fide team rule is considered to be very strict and if violators are caught (coaches and/ or players) the consequences can be extremely punitive. I know of a runner from Ludlow High School who ws given permission by her coach to leave early from a track meet (her three events were completed) so she could attend her club team's state qualifier. She was reported to the MIAA and was banned from competing for the remainder of the high school season. This young lady was a very gifted runner who early on had many college prospects. She ended up at a school with a decent track program, but struggled with the recruiting process because of her lack of high school performance times and the imposed sanctioning by the MIAA. I highly doubt that MIAA is going to be any less lenient to Academy particpants.

Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

MA Soccer the punishment for violating the Bona Fide rule is a 2 game/match/meet etc. suspension and inability to participate in the state tournament or championship. If she was banned for the season it must have been at the end of the season when the violation occurred.

I agree with you that coaches and ADs cannot randomly turn a blind eye. For instance they can't turn a regularly scheduled Tuesday afternoon practice into an optional practice just to get around the rule. But for example over the easter break when you have a lot of spring sports/club soccer tournament conflicts the coaches have more leeway on optional stuff.

The point I am making is that most HS coaches are not looking to make kids lives miserable over the Bona Fide rule and if they can avoid a conflict easily and ethically they usually do.

MASoccer
08-20-2007, 07:04 PM
MA Soccer the punishment for violating the Bona Fide rule is a 2 game/match/meet etc. suspension and inability to participate in the state tournament or championship. If she was banned for the season it must have been at the end of the season when the violation occurred.

I agree with you that coaches and ADs cannot randomly turn a blind eye. For instance they can't turn a regularly scheduled Tuesday afternoon practice into an optional practice just to get around the rule. But for example over the easter break when you have a lot of spring sports/club soccer tournament conflicts the coaches have more leeway on optional stuff.

The point I am making is that most HS coaches are not looking to make kids lives miserable over the Bona Fide rule and if they can avoid a conflict easily and ethically they usually do.

My blame is not with the coaches, I believe for the most part coaches try to work with their players. Unfortunately, this cooperation can have inadvertant negative results.

As for the girl who was suspended. It was at the end of the season. I believe she was unable to participate in the final two weeks and even though she had already qualified for the state competition, she was unable to perform. Track and field is different from other high school sports. Participants can qualify for states based on any single performance during the regular season. Unfortunately for her she had remained untested at the state level, and it left a question mark about her performance capability under these highly competitive circumstances. Since she could not particpate in the state meet, she could not continue on to the New England championships, something she was hopeful to qualify for. This inability to compete was also brought into question how serious she was about her running future. Unfortunate situation for any young athlete to be tested in.

08-21-2007, 06:54 AM
I have also seen it done the other way where a coach will make a practice optional to prevent an MIAA violation by one of their players

Just because a coach makes a practice "optional" can still be determined to be in violation of the bona fide team rule. The bona fide team rule is considered to be very strict and if violators are caught (coaches and/ or players) the consequences can be extremely punitive. I know of a runner from Ludlow High School who ws given permission by her coach to leave early from a track meet (her three events were completed) so she could attend her club team's state qualifier. She was reported to the MIAA and was banned from competing for the remainder of the high school season. This young lady was a very gifted runner who early on had many college prospects. She ended up at a school with a decent track program, but struggled with the recruiting process because of her lack of high school performance times and the imposed sanctioning by the MIAA. I highly doubt that MIAA is going to be any less lenient to Academy particpants.

Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

Only a few have Saturday classes. Some have just a few Saturdays each academic year.

But I'm curious: Why are you concerned with how private school students will deal with the Academy?

MASoccer
08-21-2007, 07:45 AM
But I'm curious: Why are you concerned with how private school students will deal with the Academy?

Not concerned just discussing...

Cujo
08-21-2007, 07:47 AM
Cujo - I don't disagree with your point, but DiPietro played at BU.

Very much like the basketball players who go for one year.


Collegiate career
DiPietro played one season (1999-2000) with Boston University in the NCAA's Hockey East. In that one year, DiPietro was named to the All-Rookie Team, named Second Team All-Hockey East, awarded the team's Co-MVP and was named Hockey East's Rookie of the Year. In addition, Dipetro nearly set the NCAA record for most saves in a game when he stopped 77 out of 80 shots in a 3-2 quadruple overtime loss to St. Lawrence during the NCAA regional final (record is 78 and held by D. Greenlaw). In his one and only Beanpot Tournament, DiPietro was named MVP and won the Eberly Trophy awarded to the tournament's top goaltender.

My bad - you are right... One year....... anyway my larger point is that his gamble and sacrifice paid off..... but for many it doesn't...... as a region Boston and the South Shore has produced more professional hockey players on a per capita basis than any other region in the last 10 years (that status may be over though...) so hockey was probably the best risk. Soccer is a huge gamble because the odds are so much lower that it will payoff.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 08:08 AM
According to the US Soccer web site, high school soccer is ok.

Do the MIAA rules prevent playing an Academy game on a weekend so long as you do not miss a high school practice or game?

Also, the initial information was that the seasons would be organized around the high school schedules for each Region. Has that changed?

Unless those HS coaches call for a meeting or practice over the weekend. It's been done before and stopped kids from doing things with their club teams.

I have never seen a coach do that - and I know many - the HS season is so compressed with so many games that you need to practice as much as possible. I scheduled Saturday practices because it was in the best interests of the team. Frequently it was the only day of the week when I could get a good workout in. This was especially important for the 3 to 5 players who saw less playing time. Keeping them fit was important. A typical schedule looked like this

SUN - Day Off
MON - Light workout - tactical / technical work / set play work / game prep
TUES - Game
WED - Light workout - tactical / technical work / set play work / game prep
THURS - Game
FRI - Light workout - tactical / technical work
SAT - Conditioning Practice - Heavy workload

Lather, Rinse, Repeat.

I really could have cared less who had club commitments or whatever other commitments they had (except family and school stuff - weddings etc). I made it clear at the beginning of the season that the player was fully committed to the team and what was going to be asked of them in terms of time commitment. I stressed to the incoming Freshman that the combined effects of school academics/sports/social left little time for other stuff in their life and that it marked a major transition time in their lives. I had some conflicts with AAU basketball and softball commitments and early on made it clear to the players that they were free to do both as long as I did not know about it or that it did not adversely affect the team. When you as a coach are juggling 35 to 40 players, managing the transportation, equipment, game and practice prep and schedules, and field logistics schedules for a Varsity and JV team, playing 18 games in a 9 week window the only thing you can focs on is the TEAM. Your secondary concern is the individual needs of the players in terms of their physical and mental health, the constant monitoring of their academic performance and adjusting to the bumps in the road that cannot be anticipated. If little Jenny Jones the Freshman is playing for a MAPLE team, her needs in terms of meeting her club commitments is WAY WAY down on the list. The idea that a coach with all these myriad burdens and commitments would deliberately schedule a 1pm practice on a Sunday to frustrate a MAPLE players needs may be the funniest thing that I have heard in a long time. To me it just shows the me me me me me first I am special mentality of too many MAPLE parents
. One of things that I gleaned from Mr. Stats posts that explained his resentment of HS soccer was that when his son showed up at the the HS level - that the Red Carpet he was expecting had not been dry cleaned and laid out in anticipation of their arrival.

08-21-2007, 08:18 AM
Why isn't there more willingness on the part of high schools sports (coaches, ADs and the MIAA) to see that kids have a reasonable sport schedule? Weekends should be exactly that, an end to the week. Too many adults take this all too seriously, including you Cujo. High school sports is an extracurricular activity and some act like it's professional sports.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 09:09 AM
Why isn't there more willingness on the part of high schools sports (coaches, ADs and the MIAA) to see that kids have a reasonable sport schedule? Weekends should be exactly that, an end to the week. Too many adults take this all too seriously, including you Cujo. High school sports is an extracurricular activity and some act like it's professional sports.

The HS soccer players take it very seriously. As a adults we respond to that and accomodate them. It is the anchor between their academic and social lives. I don't think that it is too much to ask for 2 hours of somebodies time from 10am to noon on a Saturday. What is that infringing on? Watching You Tube? IM'ing somebody on Facebook? Watching Cartoons or the Real World? Students who are active in school sports are less likely to get involved in drugs and risky sexual activity. Maybe if Milton Academy took sports more seriously they wouldn't be turning out scores of hormonal, chemically adled hedonists. My brother in law went there so please no stories about how the book is a work of fiction - if anything it is an understatement of what went on there.

I think it is an extreme leap to say that HS coaches act like HS sports are akin to professional sports. We take it seriously and run our programs as "professionals" because it is what the players, parents, school board, alums, and administration expects of us. This is totally different than equating it to professional sports. For my daughter and her fellow players her athletic experience in HS was every bit as important as her academic experience. The one thing that the MAPLE "Hawks" cannot get through their skulls is that while MAPLE may offer a more competent soccer model in many cases, it is ultimately a "me first" mercenarial experience (in both the club and players perspective), while the HS experience offers an experience that involves an entire community. There is nothing more thrilling or exhilerating than a Friday night game under the lights in October against a "next town over" rival with 700 fans, friends, and families in attendance. Nothing I experienced in MAPLE during the 8 years I was involved EVER came close. Go to a U17 MAPLE D1 game in Spring and then go to a late October Winchester-Belmont Girls Soccer Game and tell me that those two experiences are evey remotely close. The latter are playing for something bigger than themselves while the former are most likely playing for themselves. I feel bad for anyone that foregoes that experience.

I'll never forget sitting in my School's gym in January after my first season coaching and looking up on the wall and seeing banner after banner for the basketball, hockey, and football programs and having one of the soccer parents ask me when the girls soccer team was going to put one up. That stuck with me. When I took over the team it was a mess. I sat my girls down in August in the gym and asked them what was missing on the wall. They knew immediately. We lost only one game all year and won the conference championship after beating a team that had won the league title for 8 consecutive years and who had beaten us 16 consecutive times. The memory of the look of accomplishment and pride on my players faces when the banner was raised at the halftime of a basketball game was something that will stay with me forever. The AD for the dethroned team called me to congratulate my team and sent the team a letter congratulating them on their sportsmanship and accomplishment. MAPLE could never provide any of that. In the larger scheme of things it is a small moment but to those of us who spent hundreds of hours working towards a common goal that we achieved together it is something that will stay with us forever.

08-21-2007, 09:27 AM
[quote="Cujo"][ I don't think that it is too much to ask for 2 hours of somebodies time from 10am to noon on a Saturday. What is that infringing on? Watching You Tube? IM'ing somebody on Facebook? Watching Cartoons or the Real World? quote]

Gee don't generalize or anything Cujo. Sometimes you seem to have a lot of respect for the kids you coach (even if not their parents) but with statements like this, it sure makes one wonder.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 09:30 AM
[ I don't think that it is too much to ask for 2 hours of somebodies time from 10am to noon on a Saturday. What is that infringing on? Watching You Tube? IM'ing somebody on Facebook? Watching Cartoons or the Real World? quote]

Gee don't generalize or anything Cujo. Sometimes you seem to have a lot of respect for the kids you coach (even if not their parents) but with statements like this, it sure makes one wonder.

Give me a break - what does that have to do with respect. Obviously you do not have teenage children. Debate the issue. Don't be a troll........

08-21-2007, 09:44 AM
No, give ME a break. I have three, ages 17, 16 and 13. They are all athletes and you make a good point about the value of sports in the lives of children and teenagers. But you can't possibly truly believe a blanket statement that in their free time, these are things all teenagers are doing. There is lots more to life like family time & outings, church commitments, visiting relatives, even watching their siblings compete (and don't forget homework) -- my two sons do not even know how to IM and certainly have no interest in Facebook, none of my children watches cartoons or the Real World. I mean do you seriously believe this? How about one of your nice percentages (like about all those evil soccer parents out there)? I'm not saying you are right or wrong in when you schedule your practices, and when a practice is scheduled, my kids will be there. But you really are over-generalizing on this one and I think that statement shows a lack of respect for teenagers everywhere.

08-21-2007, 10:07 AM
I think the point is that you have certain expectations as a coach and you expect and require your players to abide by the standards you set forth as a coach and to commit fully to your team during the limited HS season. Those are very reasonable expectations and standards. So in return, the players deserve your respect as people and every person deserves the chance to come in with a clean slate and not have some "teenager" label pinned on them before a coach has even laid eyes on them.

And this relates to the discussion at hand because any teenager willing to make the commitment involved in participating in the new Academy program deserves the same level of respect and commitment from the adults guiding them.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 10:18 AM
No, give ME a break. I have three, ages 17, 16 and 13. They are all athletes and you make a good point about the value of sports in the lives of children and teenagers. But you can't possibly truly believe a blanket statement that in their free time, these are things all teenagers are doing. There is lots more to life like family time & outings, church commitments, visiting relatives, even watching their siblings compete (and don't forget homework) -- my two sons do not even know how to IM and certainly have no interest in Facebook, none of my children watches cartoons or the Real World. I mean do you seriously believe this? How about one of your nice percentages (like about all those evil soccer parents out there)? I'm not saying you are right or wrong in when you schedule your practices, and when a practice is scheduled, my kids will be there. But you really are over-generalizing on this one and I think that statement shows a lack of respect for teenagers everywhere.

Go look up the word rhetoric in the dictionary. Most of us covered that in 8th grade English.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 10:19 AM
I think the point is that you have certain expectations as a coach and you expect and require your players to abide by the standards you set forth as a coach and to commit fully to your team during the limited HS season. Those are very reasonable expectations and standards. So in return, the players deserve your respect as people and every person deserves the chance to come in with a clean slate and not have some "teenager" label pinned on them before a coach has even laid eyes on them.

And this relates to the discussion at hand because any teenager willing to make the commitment involved in participating in the new Academy program deserves the same level of respect and commitment from the adults guiding them.

But not at the expense of their teammates on a HS team. If they cannot fully commit to both programs they need to make a choice between the two. That is the larger point here.

two-three-five
08-21-2007, 12:58 PM
[quote="Cujo"]


I really could have cared less who had club commitments or whatever other commitments they had (except family and school stuff - weddings etc). I made it clear at the beginning of the season that the player was fully committed to the team and what was going to be asked of them in terms of time commitment. I stressed to the incoming Freshman that the combined effects of school academics/sports/social left little time for other stuff in their life and that it marked a major transition time in their lives. I had some conflicts with AAU basketball and softball commitments and early on made it clear to the players that they were free to do both as long as I did not know about it or that it did not adversely affect the team. When you as a coach are juggling 35 to 40 players, managing the transportation, equipment, game and practice prep and schedules, and field logistics schedules for a Varsity and JV team, playing 18 games in a 9 week window the only thing you can focs on is the TEAM. Your secondary concern is the individual needs of the players in terms of their physical and mental health, the constant monitoring of their academic performance and adjusting to the bumps in the road that cannot be anticipated. If little Jenny Jones the Freshman is playing for a MAPLE team, her needs in terms of meeting her club commitments is WAY WAY down on the list. The idea that a coach with all these myriad burdens and commitments would deliberately schedule a 1pm practice on a Sunday to frustrate a MAPLE players needs may be the funniest thing that I have heard in a long time. To me it just shows the me me me me me first I am special mentality of too many MAPLE parents
. One of things that I gleaned from Mr. Stats posts that explained his resentment of HS soccer was that when his son showed up at the the HS level - that the Red Carpet he was expecting had not been dry cleaned and laid out in anticipation of their arrival.[\quote]




There is no doubt that there are talented incoming freshmen about to start HS practice. On the girls side, these freshmen are more likely to be able to contribute right away because they are more physically mature than the freshmen boys.

If you are a parent of one of these talented youth, I would urge you to have patience with your HS coaches. It may take them a little while to figure out the best place for your little Landon or Mia on the HS team.
They are also (hopefully) going to be sensitive to the upperclassmen, and give them a chance to keep or win their position. The large roster sizes and the JV squad give coaches a lot of flexiblity. Some coaches will keep returning seniors on the squad, even if they will not play meaningful minutes. Also, the 18 game season gives coaches a chance to see what is working and not working, and change players and positions during the early season.

If you (the parent) are not familiar with the HS game, you may want to see a few games before you lock in an opinion about the coaches.
You may be surprised how different the games are between MAPLE and HS varsity, and how physical the games are.
All of the varsity coaches care about winning, so if your child is talented enough, they will play.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 01:08 PM
I really could have cared less who had club commitments or whatever other commitments they had (except family and school stuff - weddings etc). I made it clear at the beginning of the season that the player was fully committed to the team and what was going to be asked of them in terms of time commitment. I stressed to the incoming Freshman that the combined effects of school academics/sports/social left little time for other stuff in their life and that it marked a major transition time in their lives. I had some conflicts with AAU basketball and softball commitments and early on made it clear to the players that they were free to do both as long as I did not know about it or that it did not adversely affect the team. When you as a coach are juggling 35 to 40 players, managing the transportation, equipment, game and practice prep and schedules, and field logistics schedules for a Varsity and JV team, playing 18 games in a 9 week window the only thing you can focs on is the TEAM. Your secondary concern is the individual needs of the players in terms of their physical and mental health, the constant monitoring of their academic performance and adjusting to the bumps in the road that cannot be anticipated. If little Jenny Jones the Freshman is playing for a MAPLE team, her needs in terms of meeting her club commitments is WAY WAY down on the list. The idea that a coach with all these myriad burdens and commitments would deliberately schedule a 1pm practice on a Sunday to frustrate a MAPLE players needs may be the funniest thing that I have heard in a long time. To me it just shows the me me me me me first I am special mentality of too many MAPLE parents
. One of things that I gleaned from Mr. Stats posts that explained his resentment of HS soccer was that when his son showed up at the the HS level - that the Red Carpet he was expecting had not been dry cleaned and laid out in anticipation of their arrival.[\quote]




There is no doubt that there are talented incoming freshmen about to start HS practice. On the girls side, these freshmen are more likely to be able to contribute right away because they are more physically mature than the freshmen boys.

If you are a parent of one of these talented youth, I would urge you to have patience with your HS coaches. It may take them a little while to figure out the best place for your little Landon or Mia on the HS team.
They are also (hopefully) going to be sensitive to the upperclassmen, and give them a chance to keep or win their position. The large roster sizes and the JV squad give coaches a lot of flexiblity. Some coaches will keep returning seniors on the squad, even if they will not play meaningful minutes. Also, the 18 game season gives coaches a chance to see what is working and not working, and change players and positions during the early season.

If you (the parent) are not familiar with the HS game, you may want to see a few games before you lock in an opinion about the coaches.
You may be surprised how different the games are between MAPLE and HS varsity, and how physical the games are.
All of the varsity coaches care about winning, so if your child is talented enough, they will play.

You are right especially at the smaller schools, at the D1's and 2's like Winchester and Fenwick it would be very hard for a Freshman to break into the starting lineup. Some schools actually have policies about 1st year players even being rostered on the Varsity. I coached at a small school with around 350 students so I had a fairly small talent pool to choose from. My feeling was that if a Freshman outworked and outperformed an upper classman then they got the starting job. I usually had 1 or 2 freshman make my team per year or get moved up from varsity. This rankled some of the parents of the upperclassmen but I put the best 11 on the field. It varies from school to school. I would not roster though a Freshman who would be a bench player. I would rather they get playing time at JV. I might bring them up for a Varsity game but make sure they got plenty of time to start the season at JV. This is important for conditioning reasons, adjusting the HS style and intensity of play, and to find a comfort level. You want them ready for the inevitable injuries and or academic issues that might result in losing a varsity roster player. Fred might want to weigh in on how he handles it at Braintree and Onthree too.

08-21-2007, 01:12 PM
I really could have cared less who had club commitments or whatever other commitments they had (except family and school stuff - weddings etc). I made it clear at the beginning of the season that the player was fully committed to the team and what was going to be asked of them in terms of time commitment. I stressed to the incoming Freshman that the combined effects of school academics/sports/social left little time for other stuff in their life and that it marked a major transition time in their lives. I had some conflicts with AAU basketball and softball commitments and early on made it clear to the players that they were free to do both as long as I did not know about it or that it did not adversely affect the team. When you as a coach are juggling 35 to 40 players, managing the transportation, equipment, game and practice prep and schedules, and field logistics schedules for a Varsity and JV team, playing 18 games in a 9 week window the only thing you can focs on is the TEAM. Your secondary concern is the individual needs of the players in terms of their physical and mental health, the constant monitoring of their academic performance and adjusting to the bumps in the road that cannot be anticipated. If little Jenny Jones the Freshman is playing for a MAPLE team, her needs in terms of meeting her club commitments is WAY WAY down on the list. The idea that a coach with all these myriad burdens and commitments would deliberately schedule a 1pm practice on a Sunday to frustrate a MAPLE players needs may be the funniest thing that I have heard in a long time. To me it just shows the me me me me me first I am special mentality of too many MAPLE parents
. One of things that I gleaned from Mr. Stats posts that explained his resentment of HS soccer was that when his son showed up at the the HS level - that the Red Carpet he was expecting had not been dry cleaned and laid out in anticipation of their arrival.[\quote]




There is no doubt that there are talented incoming freshmen about to start HS practice. On the girls side, these freshmen are more likely to be able to contribute right away because they are more physically mature than the freshmen boys.

If you are a parent of one of these talented youth, I would urge you to have patience with your HS coaches. It may take them a little while to figure out the best place for your little Landon or Mia on the HS team.
They are also (hopefully) going to be sensitive to the upperclassmen, and give them a chance to keep or win their position. The large roster sizes and the JV squad give coaches a lot of flexiblity. Some coaches will keep returning seniors on the squad, even if they will not play meaningful minutes. Also, the 18 game season gives coaches a chance to see what is working and not working, and change players and positions during the early season.

If you (the parent) are not familiar with the HS game, you may want to see a few games before you lock in an opinion about the coaches.
You may be surprised how different the games are between MAPLE and HS varsity, and how physical the games are.
All of the varsity coaches care about winning, so if your child is talented enough, they will play.

You are right especially at the smaller schools, at the D1's and 2's like Winchester and Fenwick it would be very hard for a Freshman to break into the starting lineup. Some schools actually have policies about 1st year players even being rostered on the Varsity. I coached at a small school with around 350 students so I had a fairly small talent pool to choose from. My feeling was that if a Freshman outworked and outperformed an upper classman then they got the starting job. I usually had 1 or 2 freshman make my team per year or get moved up from varsity. This rankled some of the parents of the upperclassmen but I put the best 11 on the field. It varies from school to school. Fred might want to weigh in on how he handles it at Braintree and Onthree too.

When you get moved up from varsity, where do you go?

Cujo
08-21-2007, 01:14 PM
I really could have cared less who had club commitments or whatever other commitments they had (except family and school stuff - weddings etc). I made it clear at the beginning of the season that the player was fully committed to the team and what was going to be asked of them in terms of time commitment. I stressed to the incoming Freshman that the combined effects of school academics/sports/social left little time for other stuff in their life and that it marked a major transition time in their lives. I had some conflicts with AAU basketball and softball commitments and early on made it clear to the players that they were free to do both as long as I did not know about it or that it did not adversely affect the team. When you as a coach are juggling 35 to 40 players, managing the transportation, equipment, game and practice prep and schedules, and field logistics schedules for a Varsity and JV team, playing 18 games in a 9 week window the only thing you can focs on is the TEAM. Your secondary concern is the individual needs of the players in terms of their physical and mental health, the constant monitoring of their academic performance and adjusting to the bumps in the road that cannot be anticipated. If little Jenny Jones the Freshman is playing for a MAPLE team, her needs in terms of meeting her club commitments is WAY WAY down on the list. The idea that a coach with all these myriad burdens and commitments would deliberately schedule a 1pm practice on a Sunday to frustrate a MAPLE players needs may be the funniest thing that I have heard in a long time. To me it just shows the me me me me me first I am special mentality of too many MAPLE parents
. One of things that I gleaned from Mr. Stats posts that explained his resentment of HS soccer was that when his son showed up at the the HS level - that the Red Carpet he was expecting had not been dry cleaned and laid out in anticipation of their arrival.[\quote]




There is no doubt that there are talented incoming freshmen about to start HS practice. On the girls side, these freshmen are more likely to be able to contribute right away because they are more physically mature than the freshmen boys.

If you are a parent of one of these talented youth, I would urge you to have patience with your HS coaches. It may take them a little while to figure out the best place for your little Landon or Mia on the HS team.
They are also (hopefully) going to be sensitive to the upperclassmen, and give them a chance to keep or win their position. The large roster sizes and the JV squad give coaches a lot of flexiblity. Some coaches will keep returning seniors on the squad, even if they will not play meaningful minutes. Also, the 18 game season gives coaches a chance to see what is working and not working, and change players and positions during the early season.

If you (the parent) are not familiar with the HS game, you may want to see a few games before you lock in an opinion about the coaches.
You may be surprised how different the games are between MAPLE and HS varsity, and how physical the games are.
All of the varsity coaches care about winning, so if your child is talented enough, they will play.

You are right especially at the smaller schools, at the D1's and 2's like Winchester and Fenwick it would be very hard for a Freshman to break into the starting lineup. Some schools actually have policies about 1st year players even being rostered on the Varsity. I coached at a small school with around 350 students so I had a fairly small talent pool to choose from. My feeling was that if a Freshman outworked and outperformed an upper classman then they got the starting job. I usually had 1 or 2 freshman make my team per year or get moved up from varsity. This rankled some of the parents of the upperclassmen but I put the best 11 on the field. It varies from school to school. Fred might want to weigh in on how he handles it at Braintree and Onthree too.



When you get moved up from varsity, where do you go?


"to varsity"...........

08-21-2007, 01:22 PM
I really could have cared less who had club commitments or whatever other commitments they had (except family and school stuff - weddings etc). I made it clear at the beginning of the season that the player was fully committed to the team and what was going to be asked of them in terms of time commitment. I stressed to the incoming Freshman that the combined effects of school academics/sports/social left little time for other stuff in their life and that it marked a major transition time in their lives. I had some conflicts with AAU basketball and softball commitments and early on made it clear to the players that they were free to do both as long as I did not know about it or that it did not adversely affect the team. When you as a coach are juggling 35 to 40 players, managing the transportation, equipment, game and practice prep and schedules, and field logistics schedules for a Varsity and JV team, playing 18 games in a 9 week window the only thing you can focs on is the TEAM. Your secondary concern is the individual needs of the players in terms of their physical and mental health, the constant monitoring of their academic performance and adjusting to the bumps in the road that cannot be anticipated. If little Jenny Jones the Freshman is playing for a MAPLE team, her needs in terms of meeting her club commitments is WAY WAY down on the list. The idea that a coach with all these myriad burdens and commitments would deliberately schedule a 1pm practice on a Sunday to frustrate a MAPLE players needs may be the funniest thing that I have heard in a long time. To me it just shows the me me me me me first I am special mentality of too many MAPLE parents
. One of things that I gleaned from Mr. Stats posts that explained his resentment of HS soccer was that when his son showed up at the the HS level - that the Red Carpet he was expecting had not been dry cleaned and laid out in anticipation of their arrival.[\quote]




There is no doubt that there are talented incoming freshmen about to start HS practice. On the girls side, these freshmen are more likely to be able to contribute right away because they are more physically mature than the freshmen boys.

If you are a parent of one of these talented youth, I would urge you to have patience with your HS coaches. It may take them a little while to figure out the best place for your little Landon or Mia on the HS team.
They are also (hopefully) going to be sensitive to the upperclassmen, and give them a chance to keep or win their position. The large roster sizes and the JV squad give coaches a lot of flexiblity. Some coaches will keep returning seniors on the squad, even if they will not play meaningful minutes. Also, the 18 game season gives coaches a chance to see what is working and not working, and change players and positions during the early season.

If you (the parent) are not familiar with the HS game, you may want to see a few games before you lock in an opinion about the coaches.
You may be surprised how different the games are between MAPLE and HS varsity, and how physical the games are.
All of the varsity coaches care about winning, so if your child is talented enough, they will play.

You are right especially at the smaller schools, at the D1's and 2's like Winchester and Fenwick it would be very hard for a Freshman to break into the starting lineup. Some schools actually have policies about 1st year players even being rostered on the Varsity. I coached at a small school with around 350 students so I had a fairly small talent pool to choose from. My feeling was that if a Freshman outworked and outperformed an upper classman then they got the starting job. I usually had 1 or 2 freshman make my team per year or get moved up from varsity. This rankled some of the parents of the upperclassmen but I put the best 11 on the field. It varies from school to school. Fred might want to weigh in on how he handles it at Braintree and Onthree too.



When you get moved up from varsity, where do you go?


"to varsity"...........

08-21-2007, 01:38 PM
In top public schools programs the coaches know exactly who is coming in as freshmen and as in places like Winchester or Newburyport coached the players in the youth town program. In a parochial school setting it is sometimes difficult for a coach to be able to get an immediate handle on the quality of all the incoming freshmen. However, assuming that they are plugged into the local youth scene (whether through MAPLE, town or both) they usually know the reputations of most of the better players coming in and often may have helped intice some of those players to attend the school. Still HS soccer (especially on the girls side) is a much different animal than MAPLE D1. It is more physical, and more direct. Four or five pass combinations are rare but a productive striker will face a level of man on or even double team coverage unseen in club. Because of the limits on practice time and the wide span of abilities and fitness much of practice is spent on getting a team into physical shape and for game scheming. There is also a huge difference in the qulities of teams and mismatches are common. Still, there will be more people at a single big Friday night game than will see a D1 club player during his/her MAPLE career.

Cujo
08-21-2007, 02:23 PM
In top public schools programs the coaches know exactly who is coming in as freshmen and as in places like Winchester or Newburyport coached the players in the youth town program. In a parochial school setting it is sometimes difficult for a coach to be able to get an immediate handle on the quality of all the incoming freshmen. However, assuming that they are plugged into the local youth scene (whether through MAPLE, town or both) they usually know the reputations of most of the better players coming in and often may have helped intice some of those players to attend the school. Still HS soccer (especially on the girls side) is a much different animal than MAPLE D1. It is more physical, and more direct. Four or five pass combinations are rare but a productive striker will face a level of man on or even double team coverage unseen in club. Because of the limits on practice time and the wide span of abilities and fitness much of practice is spent on getting a team into physical shape and for game scheming. There is also a huge difference in the qulities of teams and mismatches are common. Still, there will be more people at a single big Friday night game than will see a D1 club player during his/her MAPLE career.

Good point about the parochial vs public side. I coached parochial and typically knew about half of the incoming players who had either played for or against me in town or MAPLE programs.

MASC
08-21-2007, 04:21 PM
Can people stop quoting whole posts. It is a waste of time to try and get through the endless repetitions.

Edit down the qutes to what is necessary and stop with the multi-screen fulls of repeated posts.

MASC
08-21-2007, 04:45 PM
With respect to the Catholic HS's, another "urban myth" has been posted.

There is no recruiting done by the soccer coaches or the school. What I have seen is a great deal of pressure brought to bear on players from those in their home towns to discourage their attending the Catholic HS's.

Just to remind those who want to perpetuate this urban myth, the Catholic HS's are very closely scritunized by all of the various oversight organizations. These people would love nothing better than to find excuses to sanction these schools.

Families that send their children to Catholic HS pay twice for their children's education, once in federal, state and local taxes and then for tuition to the HS's. Additionally, there is no free transportaiton. In my town the public HS's soccer team would be very much more competitive if the best soccer players weren't attending private, religious or Catholic HS's (to list a few - BC High, Xaverian, Bishop Feehan, St. John's, St. Mary's, Catholic Memorial, St. Mark's, Moses Brown, Rivers, Nobles, ...).

08-22-2007, 09:34 AM
First let's make the bright line distinction between MIAA member private schools (most of which are catholic parochial schools) and non MIAA privates most of which fall under the NEPSAC. NEPSAC schools like BB&N, Phillips Andover or Middlesex do recruit and offer financial assistance to athletes. They are bound by NEPSAC rules and internal policies but are not encumbered by any MIAA rules. These schools are really not part of this debate but during the next 5-10 you should expect more and more top quality soccer players to end up at NEPSAC schools. MIAA privates like St. Johns Prep or BC High are bound by the same rules as their public brothers and sisters. MASC is correct that the MIAA takes recruiting very seriously and does investigate and punish schools that violate the rules (and BTW there have been allegations of public schools recruiting). However, the intrinsic inequity of the situation, especially with the real big parochials, makes complete regulation impossible. Public school recruiting requires the player to claim residency in that school district. This can and does happen via aunts, uncles, grandparents ect but such a move is easily identified. However, because BC High draws students from all over greater Boston they can get a player from Roslindale, East Boston or Quincy and the evidence trail as to why the student attended BC High is a little murky. Additionally, as someone else pointed out in another thread, the pool of actual athletic participants at places like Xavarian or SJP dwarfs every other D1 school - with or without recruiting!

This is how a transfer waiver works. Brendan Bonds attends Grover Cleveland Public High School and as a freshman striker he scores 23 goals and is all-conference, but the team isn't very good and won't be during his tenure. Brendan's mom and dad talk to some folks and decide that Brendan should transfer to Our Lady of the Sacred Miracle School. OLSM was state finalist the year before. He gets in but they soon find that the MIAA requires such varsity transfers to sit out one year in that sport unless they can obtain a waiver. (Strangely Brendan could opt to play football and not need to sit out). You can easily obtain the waiver if after a joint meeting the Grover Cleveland and OLSM ADs agree that they don't think athletics had anything to do with the transfer, but if Grover Cleveland officials inform the MIAA that they think athletics did play a part, then Bonds and OLSM must request a hearing. At the Hearing Bonds parents will inform the 3 member panel of all the wonderful non-athletic reasons that young Brendon is transferring - and unless they are complete fools and admit that athletics was a driving force, the waiver will be granted and OLSM has a 20 goal scorer. The same scenerio can occur if the Bonds decided to move two towns over and attend WH Taft High School, but it is less likely that Grover Cleveland would try to block that move.

08-22-2007, 03:06 PM
Response to Mr MIAA:

At least some of the NEPSAC schools actively recruit for athletics.
They may not offer financial aid directly related to athletics, but I'm sure that the schools and parents can figure out the system.

I think at the parochial schools, the "recruiting" is done by the parents and players, which is no different than MAPLE.

08-22-2007, 04:22 PM
Response to Mr MIAA:

At least some of the NEPSAC schools actively recruit for athletics.
They may not offer financial aid directly related to athletics, but I'm sure that the schools and parents can figure out the system.

I think at the parochial schools, the "recruiting" is done by the parents and players, which is no different than MAPLE.

I agree -- NEPSAC schools are active recruiters especially when dealing with upper class athletes. The common deal is for a student to repeat their sophomore season at the private school, which means they are getting a proven HS performer and provides a back-door way to get a 5th year senior, although some like Phillips do offer a straight PG year. Recruiting at parochials is often very subtle and and may not directly involve anyone in the administration, faculty or staff. I don't believe that soccer is a sport where you would find lots of recruiting. Basketball and hockey have traditionally been rumored to feature recruiting issues (I believe St. Mary's (L) was sanctioned for violations afew years back) but it is a fine line between improper influence and simply a desire to play in a successful program. The real problem is that if I am a good student, solid citizen and stellar soccer player who happens to live in a school district with a mediocre or poor soccer team I can't transfer two towns over to attend school and play soccer (school choice and METCO programs aside) but I can go to a nearby parochial. That gives those schools a huge advantage - illegal recruiting or not.

footyfan
08-23-2007, 08:37 PM
But I'm curious: Why are you concerned with how private school students will deal with the Academy?

Not concerned just discussing...

Many of the 128 based club teams (I can speak to the boys side not the girls) have more than a few players at Nobles and BBN and Rivers and BC High. This could impact the BOLTS specifically with their Academy designation and other teams depending on who else applies and get accepted.

And Yes MIAA depending on who is interperting and enforcing can be that unyielding.

08-24-2007, 03:43 PM
Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

So then, I assume you'll be attending ther information session held by the Bolts on Sept 2 so that all your questions and concerns xcan be addressed?

08-24-2007, 06:16 PM
Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

So then, I assume you'll be attending ther information session held by the Bolts on Sept 2 so that all your questions and concerns xcan be addressed?

Probably not this year, most boys are committed elsewhere, to bad the info wasn't available earlier. But now that I think about it, the Bolts won't be in MAPLE, so they can recruit anytime they want...

08-25-2007, 08:00 AM
Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

So then, I assume you'll be attending ther information session held by the Bolts on Sept 2 so that all your questions and concerns xcan be addressed?

Probably not this year, most boys are committed elsewhere, to bad the info wasn't available earlier. But now that I think about it, the Bolts won't be in MAPLE, so they can recruit anytime they want...

There's a good "head in the sand" attitude. You don't have to try out or practice. Just go and see what it's all about. But why should you go and actually obtain some correct information when it's so much easier to sit at your computer and post your lies and misinformation?

Here's the rather funny part about those who have this attitude. If the Bolts were really all about reccruiting as they have been accused of so many times, why would they need to hold an additional tryout now?

08-25-2007, 08:18 AM
Maybe he doesn't want to take time out of his busy life to go learn something that his son has no desire to participate in. If the Bolts want to educate the masses who aren't interested in the academy, why don't they have a representative do so in this forum? How about an online question forum with John Kerr?

08-25-2007, 08:42 AM
Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

So then, I assume you'll be attending ther information session held by the Bolts on Sept 2 so that all your questions and concerns xcan be addressed?

Probably not this year, most boys are committed elsewhere, to bad the info wasn't available earlier. But now that I think about it, the Bolts won't be in MAPLE, so they can recruit anytime they want...

There's a good "head in the sand" attitude. You don't have to try out or practice. Just go and see what it's all about. But why should you go and actually obtain some correct information when it's so much easier to sit at your computer and post your lies and misinformation?

Here's the rather funny part about those who have this attitude. If the Bolts were really all about reccruiting as they have been accused of so many times, why would they need to hold an additional tryout now?

Easy Turbo-

You read my post with spite in mind...
I said "probably" meaning "maybe" as in "unsure"
I said "committed elsewhere" as in "signed with different teams already" (most likely a fact)
I said "too bad the info wasn't available sooner" as in "before boys committed to different teams" (also a fact)
I said the Bolts aren't in Maple (fact)
I said the Bolts U16-U18 can recruit whenever they want now (fact)

The reason they need another tryout is because they haven't been able to fill the roster yet, not necessarily because they haven't recruited.

I understand you (assuming you're a Bolt) are feeling frustrated. The untimely departure of Okaroh has had an impact on the number of boys initially expected to contribute to this program. Latronica leaving last minute doesn't help either.

IMO this program will be great in a few years. Current U12-U14s will have time to consider their options and choose their "soccer path." The current U16-U18s are immersed in their current clubs and "traditional college paths" and may be unwilling to try something so different at this late stage. I know they may be missing out on a great opportunity, however, not everyone wants to be first to try something new.

FSM
08-25-2007, 09:28 AM
Clubs all over the country are dealing with the same issues as the Bolts, so the problems they are facing pulling the program together should not be looked upon as a failure on the part of the Bolts.

08-25-2007, 03:34 PM
Another concern I had raised in the past is the response towards those players who attend private schools. Many of them have classes on Saturdays, as well as after school obligations. Will the Academy be problematic for those particpants?

So then, I assume you'll be attending ther information session held by the Bolts on Sept 2 so that all your questions and concerns xcan be addressed?

Probably not this year, most boys are committed elsewhere, to bad the info wasn't available earlier. But now that I think about it, the Bolts won't be in MAPLE, so they can recruit anytime they want...

There's a good "head in the sand" attitude. You don't have to try out or practice. Just go and see what it's all about. But why should you go and actually obtain some correct information when it's so much easier to sit at your computer and post your lies and misinformation?

Here's the rather funny part about those who have this attitude. If the Bolts were really all about reccruiting as they have been accused of so many times, why would they need to hold an additional tryout now?

Easy Turbo-

You read my post with spite in mind...
I said "probably" meaning "maybe" as in "unsure"
I said "committed elsewhere" as in "signed with different teams already" (most likely a fact)
I said "too bad the info wasn't available sooner" as in "before boys committed to different teams" (also a fact)
I said the Bolts aren't in Maple (fact)
I said the Bolts U16-U18 can recruit whenever they want now (fact)

The reason they need another tryout is because they haven't been able to fill the roster yet, not necessarily because they haven't recruited.

I understand you (assuming you're a Bolt) are feeling frustrated. The untimely departure of Okaroh has had an impact on the number of boys initially expected to contribute to this program. Latronica leaving last minute doesn't help either.

IMO this program will be great in a few years. Current U12-U14s will have time to consider their options and choose their "soccer path." The current U16-U18s are immersed in their current clubs and "traditional college paths" and may be unwilling to try something so different at this late stage. I know they may be missing out on a great opportunity, however, not everyone wants to be first to try something new.

Uh, no turbo for me. I am a strict hybrid person.

You posted in spite, so it got the reply it deserved.

Not a bolt, and certainly not frustrated. And I don't begrudge a coach for moving on to a situation he feels is better for him. His leaving should have no effect on the number of boys going to his team. Were they flocking to play for him when he was a bolts coach? I understand that there were as many people who hated playing for him as who loved it. His reputation is not as a warm & fuzzy coach.

This forum makes it so easy to post garbage, lies, and rumors. The likes of MASoccer has been a poster who has expressed "concern" over the Academy program, and who has verbalized reservations about it. Here is a perfect opportunity to acquire first hand knowledge and ask the questions of a person directly involved. Get the answers yourself. Take the initiative.

08-25-2007, 03:39 PM
Maybe he doesn't want to take time out of his busy life to go learn something that his son has no desire to participate in. If the Bolts want to educate the masses who aren't interested in the academy, why don't they have a representative do so in this forum? How about an online question forum with John Kerr?

Oh yeah. As if he's got nothing better to do than respond to yahoos such as yourself in a forum.

The responsibility on "educating the masses" is not on the Bolts, or any other club. And they certainly wouldn't do it for anyone not interested. But for the few that are interested enough to ask questions in this forum, or criticisize them or the program, here's your chance to go learn a little something instead of sitting lazily on your butts typing another anonymous nasty post.

FSM
08-25-2007, 04:03 PM
Personally, I wish clubs would take the responsibility to "educate the masses".

FXWLD 24/7
08-25-2007, 04:47 PM
Maybe he doesn't want to take time out of his busy life to go learn something that his son has no desire to participate in. If the Bolts want to educate the masses who aren't interested in the academy, why don't they have a representative do so in this forum? How about an online question forum with John Kerr?

I like this idea, especially since some boys may still be participating in pre-season activities. Also the meeting is over Labor Day Weekend which may be inconvenient for some.

Fred- if the Scorps were involved in the academy on the girl's side would you make yourself available on the forum to discuss the opportunity? Is it unreasonable to expect this form of communication? (I'm not being facetious here, it's a genuine question.) How would you get the word out?Thanks

08-25-2007, 07:44 PM
The Bolts have plenty of email addresses on their web site. If people have specific questions, I am sure there will be people willing to answer them. However, I guess it is much easier for people to complain and whine on this forum and criticize the Bolts!

MASoccer
08-25-2007, 08:58 PM
The Bolts have plenty of email addresses on their web site. If people have specific questions, I am sure there will be people willing to answer them. However, I guess it is much easier for people to complain and whine on this forum and criticize the Bolts!

Seems like you're the only one whining. Move along the complaining has gotten old...

08-26-2007, 08:27 AM
The Bolts have plenty of email addresses on their web site. If people have specific questions, I am sure there will be people willing to answer them. However, I guess it is much easier for people to complain and whine on this forum and criticize the Bolts!

Seems like you're the only one whining. Move along the complaining has gotten old...

Seems like they make good advice which you might want to consider. Although it would keep you from being able to post your concerns and misinformed rumors. There's a lot less fun in it for you with knowledge.

FXWLD 24/7
08-26-2007, 09:07 AM
The Bolts have plenty of email addresses on their web site. If people have specific questions, I am sure there will be people willing to answer them. However, I guess it is much easier for people to complain and whine on this forum and criticize the Bolts!

Seems like you're the only one whining. Move along the complaining has gotten old...

Seems like they make good advice which you might want to consider. Although it would keep you from being able to post your concerns and misinformed rumors. There's a lot less fun in it for you with knowledge.

Guest,
The mistake you make is that people can state the 10 reasons why they wouldn't buy a timeshare, without attending the 90 minute sales pitch. As other "guests" and ZAP have suggested, some on this forum have gone to the USSF website and read the material. In general, there is much less comment about the academy (even by MASoccer).

IMO, you should take your "head out of the sand." 6 of your top coaches have left to pursue other opportunities. How many more have to leave before you acknowledge that there could be a problem?

Fred Marks
08-26-2007, 10:24 AM
"Fred- if the Scorps were involved in the academy on the girl's side would you make yourself available on the forum to discuss the opportunity?"

I would but I am already a member of the Forum. I wouldnt criticize another club DOC or administrator from not doing so. I dont belong to the Forum as a Club Administrator, I joined more so as a coach or soccer fan.

If the Academy were something I wanted to tell people about I would choose the most effective way(s) to do that. I am not so sure this forum covers the entire market but being a member here I would use this Forum in addition to whatever other method(s) I chose to promote it.

Fred M.