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MASoccer
08-10-2007, 09:13 PM
Looks like the MIAA has reversed their earlier ruling on mouthguards. Last June the MIAA had changed the mouthguard rule for soccer from mandatory to "highly recommended".

The MIAA Medical Committee presented to the MIAA Board their objection to the June rule change making mouth guards 'highly recommended' and convinced the board to reverse the ruling making it mandatory for mouth guards again.

page 71 - Rule 77.1.5 of the MIAA blue book

MIAA Handbook July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2009

77.) Soccer

77.1.5 - Mouth guards are required for all soccer players while on the field.
http://www.miaa.net/bluebook.htm

http://www.miaa.net/soccer_mouthguard.htm

FSM
08-11-2007, 09:03 AM
It amazes me that the MIAA is concerned with mouthguard rules, earring rules and size of shin guards, but not the number of games played in a compressed season which probably results in far more injuries.

Cujo
08-11-2007, 09:50 AM
It amazes me that the MIAA is concerned with mouthguard rules, earring rules and size of shin guards, but not the number of games played in a compressed season which probably results in far more injuries.

Good point - I never saw a mouthguard prevent an injury in the 6 years I coached HS. But I did see plenty of injuries from playing 4 games in 10 days. There were some years that I had 20 kids on the roster with half sporting some kind of injury.

08-11-2007, 05:24 PM
Such a foolish rule. In the 25 years that I have coached youth soccer, I have NEVER had a player lose a tooth. Have had several broken noses, a few bones and a lot of twisated knee's and ankles. The latter were the most frequent and because of too many games in a short window.


We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

Cujo
08-11-2007, 07:34 PM
Such a foolish rule. In the 25 years that I have coached youth soccer, I have NEVER had a player lose a tooth. Have had several broken noses, a few bones and a lot of twisated knee's and ankles. The latter were the most frequent and because of too many games in a short window.


We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

My experience of injuries were in this order

1 Ankles 2 Quads 3 shin on shin 4 Knee/Patellar 5 Head ie bloody broken nose concussion

Red van
08-11-2007, 07:38 PM
We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

Hepatitis?!? How about bird flu!?!

Red van
08-11-2007, 07:38 PM
We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

Hepatitis?!? How about bird flu!?!

MASoccer
08-11-2007, 07:48 PM
Such a foolish rule. In the 25 years that I have coached youth soccer, I have NEVER had a player lose a tooth. Have had several broken noses, a few bones and a lot of twisated knee's and ankles. The latter were the most frequent and because of too many games in a short window.


We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

Although I agree that the mouth guard rule is an unecesary one, technically, the argument for mouth guard use is supposedly to help prevent concussions/ head injuries. It is interesting, however, that MIAA promotes a number of dentists to "assist" in the distribution of mouth guards.

The Massachusetts Dental Society in an effort to facilitate in the implementation of the MIAA soccer mouth guard standard has provided the Association a comprehensive list of dentists who will:

Distribute boil and bite mouth guards for a nominal fee; and
Fabricate custom mouth guards for a nominal fee.
Click here to find a dentist near you. http://www.massdental.org/public/health.cfm?doc_id=1389

I have yet to find a dentist who would fabricate mouth guards for a "nominal fee". http://www.pic4ever.com/images/90.gif

08-11-2007, 07:54 PM
We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

Hepatitis?!? How about bird flu!?!

That is "bird goo."

:shock:

Red van
08-11-2007, 08:10 PM
We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

Hepatitis?!? How about bird flu!?!

That is "bird goo."

:shock:

Eeeewwwww........ :vom:

08-12-2007, 04:20 PM
Shinguards? Does anyone know anything about the new or will now be enoforced shinguard rule for HS? Heard soemthing about it but not the whole thing and was hoping someone has the entire reg and wondered if it was new rule?

Tx

MASoccer
08-12-2007, 04:37 PM
Shinguards? Does anyone know anything about the new or will now be enoforced shinguard rule for HS? Heard soemthing about it but not the whole thing and was hoping someone has the entire reg and wondered if it was new rule?

Tx

All I know is that the ruling will definately not go into effect this year.

MASoccer
08-12-2007, 05:06 PM
Shinguards? Does anyone know anything about the new or will now be enoforced shinguard rule for HS? Heard soemthing about it but not the whole thing and was hoping someone has the entire reg and wondered if it was new rule?

Tx

OK, found this info at the National Federation of State High School Associations. This is the governing body of the MIAA.

http://www.nfhs.org/web/2007/03/nfhs_soccer_rules_changes_20072.aspx

NFHS Soccer Rules Changes 2007-2008

4-1-1 Beginning with the fall 2008 season, shinguards must meet the National Operating Committee on Standards for Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) specifications.

Previously it was intended that this rule was to go into effect for Fall of 2007.

http://www.nfhs.org/web/2006/02/200607_comments_on_the_rules.aspx


4-1-1: Over the past five years, attempts to clarify the coverage, placement and size of shinguards on players within the text of the rule has fallen short. Beginning with the Fall 2007 soccer season, players will be permitted to wear only shinguards that meet the National Operating Committee for the Safety of Athletic Equipment (NOCSAE) specifications. Shinguards that meet the standard will have a permanent seal or mark visible on the front of the equipment. Each manufacturer whose shinguards meets the standard will be required to indicate the height of the player that would be permitted to wear that specific equipment. Coaches should be certain that every player has shinguards with the NOCSAE seal and that the player meets the height requirement posted by the manufacturer on the equipment. During the pre-game inspection, officials need only ask the coaches if their players are legally and properly equipped according to NFHS Soccer Rules. http://www.pic4ever.com/5020.gif

08-12-2007, 10:06 PM
My daughter needed a pair of shinguards in a hurry because she was leaving for camp, she picked some up at Target and I noticed they came with the NOCSAE approval

08-12-2007, 10:25 PM
Such a foolish rule. In the 25 years that I have coached youth soccer, I have NEVER had a player lose a tooth. Have had several broken noses, a few bones and a lot of twisated knee's and ankles. The latter were the most frequent and because of too many games in a short window.


We have a lot of Canadian geese on our fields in the fall. What happens when the mouthguards are dropped on the field? A better chacne for hepatitis rather than a wobbly tooth. Just a foolish rule.

I have seen more kids choke on mouth guards than lose teeth. I also have a tough time understanding how kids communicate while playing with them.

This is a product of a society that wants kids to wear helmets while sledding, outlaws dodge ball, and has warnings that coffee may be hot.

I am working on a personal sized, aseptic, hermetically sealed bubble for sports use. Any possible backers contact me via email.

08-16-2007, 07:54 AM
It amazes me that the MIAA is concerned with mouthguard rules, earring rules and size of shin guards, but not the number of games played in a compressed season which probably results in far more injuries.

Good point - I never saw a mouthguard prevent an injury in the 6 years I coached HS. But I did see plenty of injuries from playing 4 games in 10 days. There were some years that I had 20 kids on the roster with half sporting some kind of injury.

Is it true that it has to be a color so that in the event it gets lodged down in the throat you can see it?

Cujo
08-16-2007, 08:18 AM
It amazes me that the MIAA is concerned with mouthguard rules, earring rules and size of shin guards, but not the number of games played in a compressed season which probably results in far more injuries.

Good point - I never saw a mouthguard prevent an injury in the 6 years I coached HS. But I did see plenty of injuries from playing 4 games in 10 days. There were some years that I had 20 kids on the roster with half sporting some kind of injury.

Is it true that it has to be a color so that in the event it gets lodged down in the throat you can see it?

Not that I heard of.

08-16-2007, 08:39 AM
I heard that it had to be colored so the refs could see that it is in the player's mouth.

08-16-2007, 08:41 AM
The clear ones need to have a colored line through them (usually a thin line) so they are visible to the referees.

08-16-2007, 09:01 AM
The clear ones need to have a colored line through them (usually a thin line) so they are visible to the referees.

So they wanted them to put somehting in their mouths that could potetntially cause them to choke.

08-16-2007, 11:03 AM
The clear ones need to have a colored line through them (usually a thin line) so they are visible to the referees.

So they wanted them to put somehting in their mouths that could potetntially cause them to choke.

That's a very good point. The non-custom mouthguards are left to kids to form and thus could very easily lead to choking if done improperly. Are there any cases of kids choking?

beentheredonethat
08-16-2007, 11:37 AM
The mouth guard issue is not really a soccer issue. The roots of the issue actually come from football where there is significant evidence to support that mouth guards help lessen concussions. From what I was led to believe the powers that be felt that they could not mandate mouth guards in one contact sport and not in the others.

FSM
08-16-2007, 11:41 AM
Wouldn't the difference in mouth guards in football be the fact that they are attached to the helmets and less likely to be swallowed?

08-16-2007, 11:43 AM
The mouth guard issue is not really a soccer issue. The roots of the issue actually come from football where there is significant evidence to support that mouth guards help lessen concussions. From what I was led to believe the powers that be felt that they could not mandate mouth guards in one contact sport and not in the others.

Using the MIAA's logic, than soccer players should be wearing helmets.

Cujo
08-16-2007, 12:23 PM
The mouth guard issue is not really a soccer issue. The roots of the issue actually come from football where there is significant evidence to support that mouth guards help lessen concussions. From what I was led to believe the powers that be felt that they could not mandate mouth guards in one contact sport and not in the others.

Using the MIAA's logic, than soccer players should be wearing helmets.

They also require them for basketball. FYI - many girls cut the mouthguard way down so it basically covers the front teeth. This is why the refs have them show the mouthguard out of their mouth. The kids then have two different mouthguards.

08-21-2007, 04:39 PM
If you want to figure out how the MIAA, like the MDC, MBTA or Turnpike Authority, acts as a good old fashioned beurocracy... look no further than this explaination of the about face on the foolish mouth-piece rule:

http://www.miaa.net/Soccer-Mouthpieces- ... -Aug07.htm (http://www.miaa.net/Soccer-Mouthpieces-BOD-action-Aug07.htm)

In the MIAA it is all about turf protection, in this case it is the wonderful world of dentistry (a step above chiropractics and just below podiatrists as wanabee MDs).

Why was the rule returned?? because the decision to scrap didn't follow the requiste 2 year wait and so the dental boys cried foul -- and the spineless Board followed suit. When is someone going to expose this group of leeches for what they are? Oh I-Team please dig up the dirt!!!