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MASoccer
07-14-2007, 07:53 PM
Now that District Select is underway, I'm curious if people think that the level of play has improved. Last year was the first year that MYSA allowed ODP players to participate. In my younger son's age group we only knew of a few other ODP players that participated. This year it seems that all of the teams in his age group have at least one ODP player. Coincidently, the level of play this year seems to have gotten much better. Years ago when my older son participated District Select was more like a decent town team.

Have you tried District Select? It's local, it's cheap, the kids have fun and the quality of play gets better every year. It's probably equivilant to Div 2. It could become MA's best kept secret.

Wanted to get back to this. This is dead on about District Select being the best kept secret. For the high school age kids who want to get in shape for the season and work on their game its a great situation. Two games on Sunday for 4 weeks with a weekend tournament the first week in August. It's just about playing soccer for the love of playing soccer. They don't even keep standings.

I absolutely agree that DS is the best bang for the soccer buck. For just over $100 the players get four weeks of games (some play mid-week all play double headers on weekends) A well run tournament first weekend of August. Full uniform kit and a great playing environment. My younger son loves DS. This is the one time of year he can experiment with positions he's doesn't typically play. The coaches are low key, no practices and the kids have a blast! And as I said with the infusion of some higher level players, it seems overall the DS program has gotten more competitive.

FXWLD 24/7
07-14-2007, 10:08 PM
MA-
I completely agree. About the only thing you didn't mention is that they make a whole new set of friends. My daughter met one of her current best friends through District. Her team has a very good Maple coach and a 1-2 ODP kids. She looks forward to it every year!

07-15-2007, 02:42 PM
Are District parents concerned about burnout? Kids in Maple play and train year-round, except for time off around the November and December holidays. Many are dual rostered on town travel teams. Should (non-Super Y) 12- and 13-year-olds be playing competitive soccer in July, too? Isn't this a good time to rest and rejuvenate, both physically and mentally?

MASoccer
07-15-2007, 04:33 PM
Are District parents concerned about burnout? Kids in Maple play and train year-round, except for time off around the November and December holidays. Many are dual rostered on town travel teams. Should (non-Super Y) 12- and 13-year-olds be playing competitive soccer in July, too? Isn't this a good time to rest and rejuvenate, both physically and mentally?

Normally I would agree with you, but for my boys DS has been a nice change of pace. It has always been very low pressure and a lot of fun for both of them. Their usually aren't any practices and if there are there is no requirement to go. Since its broken up by districts the boys tend to match up against players that are on their club teams. My younger son spends more time chatting with his club teammates on the field than off. (He claims that this is a good strategy because it distracts the better players on the opposing team :lol: )

Although it's good to take a break in the summer, many of the older boys are preparing for high school and need to at least be in somewhat decent shape entering into pre-season. It's also important to be getting some soccer exposure in this down time. DS in many ways fills that gap. The games are non result oriented, the only thing that really counts is the tournament the first weekend in August. As I said before, the boys are able to experiment a bit more, playing positions that they might not have had a lot of exposure to.

All of this, however, needs to be kept in perspective. If players are playing numerous things at once like ODP, Bay State Games, numerous camps, captains practices and/ or High School soccer league on top of DS, that would not be wise.

07-15-2007, 05:27 PM
Are District parents concerned about burnout? Kids in Maple play and train year-round, except for time off around the November and December holidays. Many are dual rostered on town travel teams. Should (non-Super Y) 12- and 13-year-olds be playing competitive soccer in July, too? Isn't this a good time to rest and rejuvenate, both physically and mentally?

Normally I would agree with you, but for my boys DS has been a nice change of pace. It has always been very low pressure and a lot of fun for both of them. Their usually aren't any practices and if there are there is no requirement to go. Since its broken up by districts the boys tend to match up against players that are on their club teams. My younger son spends more time chatting with his club teammates on the field than off. (He claims that this is a good strategy because it distracts the better players on the opposing team :lol: )

Although it's good to take a break in the summer, many of the older boys are preparing for high school and need to at least be in somewhat decent shape entering into pre-season. It's also important to be getting some soccer exposure in this down time. DS in many ways fills that gap. The games are non result oriented, the only thing that really counts is the tournament the first weekend in August. As I said before, the boys are able to experiment a bit more, playing positions that they might not have had a lot of exposure to.

All of this, however, needs to be kept in perspective. If players are playing numerous things at once like ODP, Bay State Games, numerous camps, captains practices and/ or High School soccer league on top of DS, that would not be wise.

Thanks, that's a great answer. :)

justanovicecoach
07-15-2007, 06:50 PM
Just came from my district games and the competition is pretty good.I can only speak for my daughter and she loves playing with new kids all the time. It is a great way for kids to meet new kids while playing the the game they love to play. We have tried to get her to do other stuff (piano, art camps) during the summer. All she wants to do is play. So district is a great thing for her be involved in. Low cost, lots of playing time and great lime green uniform to play in. There team (chose by them not me) is TMNT. Teenage muntant ninja turtles.

justanovicecoach
07-15-2007, 06:51 PM
Just came from my district games and the competition is pretty good.I can only speak for my daughter and she loves playing with new kids all the time. It is a great way for kids to meet new kids while playing the the game they love to play. We have tried to get her to do other stuff (piano, art camps) during the summer. All she wants to do is play. So district is a great thing for her be involved in. Low cost, lots of playing time and great lime green uniform to play in. There team (chose by them not me) is TMNT. Teenage muntant ninja turtles.

07-16-2007, 06:24 AM
Just came from my district games and the competition is pretty good.I can only speak for my daughter and she loves playing with new kids all the time. It is a great way for kids to meet new kids while playing the the game they love to play. We have tried to get her to do other stuff (piano, art camps) during the summer. All she wants to do is play. So district is a great thing for her be involved in. Low cost, lots of playing time and great lime green uniform to play in. There team (chose by them not me) is TMNT. Teenage muntant ninja turtles.

From the games we've been playing the only benefit is meeting new friends. Kick and run...kick and run. Horrible to be honest.

07-16-2007, 07:02 AM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

07-16-2007, 11:44 AM
Just came from my district games and the competition is pretty good.I can only speak for my daughter and she loves playing with new kids all the time. It is a great way for kids to meet new kids while playing the the game they love to play. We have tried to get her to do other stuff (piano, art camps) during the summer. All she wants to do is play. So district is a great thing for her be involved in. Low cost, lots of playing time and great lime green uniform to play in. There team (chose by them not me) is TMNT. Teenage muntant ninja turtles.

From the games we've been playing the only benefit is meeting new friends. Kick and run...kick and run. Horrible to be honest.

Our experience has been just the opposite. My daughters coach has them focus on a lot of passing and playmaking. And this is at the U13 level. It's probably due to the different level or qualifications of the coach.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 11:47 AM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U? Looks like you nipped his having fun in the bud. Nice job.

I love how you say "This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program" and then immediately proceed to insult them. DS is what it is. I bet you are one of those people who spend their whole vacation on the cell phone or crackberry with the office.

07-16-2007, 11:51 AM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U?

Why would you ask that sarcastic question?

Cujo
07-16-2007, 11:53 AM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U?

Why would you ask that sarcastic question?

Your post is unbelievabley arrogant........ got your life wrapped up in a neat little package dontcha?

07-16-2007, 11:58 AM
CUJO - LIGHTEN UP, WOULDJA? This guy isn't allowed an opinion? Isn't this what this forum is supposed to be about. Seriously man, you gotta chill.

07-16-2007, 12:00 PM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U? Looks like you nipped his having fun in the bud. Nice job.

I love how you say "This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program" and then immediately proceed to insult them. DS is what it is. I bet you are one of those people who spend their whole vacation on the cell phone or crackberry with the office.

What a jerk you are!

What does Manchester United have to do with anything? Is that your way of dealing with the fact that some players are better than others, and that perhaps some levels of play may be innapropriate? That's not insulting anyone.

He didn't need one of his parents to take the fun out of it for him. The other families did that when they'd choose not to show up because it was too hot to play a doubleheader, leaving 11 or 12 kids to play a doubleheader on their own. They certainly didn't choose to blow it off because it was high level soccer. And don't reply with the "families are supposed to commit to the duration of the program" crap. They all agree to be part of it, and then all of sudden "things come up".

How you make a leap from that post to assuming I would be on a cell phone or blackberry during vacation is puzzling. You obviously hate people. I hope you soon get to crawl back into whatever hole makes you happy.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:01 PM
CUJO - LIGHTEN UP, WOULDJA? This guy isn't allowed an opinion? Isn't this what this forum is supposed to be about. Seriously man, you gotta chill.

lighten up? I know alot of district players and coaches and to insult them this way is totally uncalled for. They also happen to be MAPLE and HS coaches. And players.

I have and will always call out people with the attitude that their kids are too good to play with other kids. Parents are the worst evaluators of their kids talent. They should leave that to other people.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:04 PM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U? Looks like you nipped his having fun in the bud. Nice job.

I love how you say "This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program" and then immediately proceed to insult them. DS is what it is. I bet you are one of those people who spend their whole vacation on the cell phone or crackberry with the office.

What a jerk you are!

What does Manchester United have to do with anything? Is that your way of dealing with the fact that some players are better than others, and that perhaps some levels of play may be innapropriate? That's not insulting anyone.

He didn't need one of his parents to take the fun out of it for him. The other families did that when they'd choose not to show up because it was too hot to play a doubleheader, leaving 11 or 12 kids to play a doubleheader on their own. They certainly didn't choose to blow it off because it was high level soccer. And don't reply with the "families are supposed to commit to the duration of the program" crap. They all agree to be part of it, and then all of sudden "things come up".

How you make a leap from that post to assuming I would be on a cell phone or blackberry during vacation is puzzling. You obviously hate people. I hope you soon get to crawl back into whatever hole makes you happy.

What qualifies you to judge that your kid is too good to play with certain players? As a long-time coach the LAST person I would ask to evaluate a player is a parent.

ontheball
07-16-2007, 12:12 PM
This is the third summer my son has played district select and he loves it. He has played with some of the best players in the state and has been fortunate to have had a wonderful coach who really loves the game. We feel really fortunate that Mass Youth Soccer runs this program every summer.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:14 PM
This is the third summer my son has played district select and he loves it. He has played with some of the best players in the state and has been fortunate to have had a wonderful coach who really loves the game. We feel really fortunate that Mass Youth Soccer runs this program every summer.

Great post and well said. This is someone who gets it. Now compare and contrast to mr. mykidistoogoodfordistricts

07-16-2007, 12:17 PM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:28 PM
[quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Bravo!!!!

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:38o2nq5o]

Qualified enough to know that arrogant parents like you cause 99% of the problems in youth soccer.

07-16-2007, 12:28 PM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U? Looks like you nipped his having fun in the bud. Nice job.

I love how you say "This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program" and then immediately proceed to insult them. DS is what it is. I bet you are one of those people who spend their whole vacation on the cell phone or crackberry with the office.

What a jerk you are!

What does Manchester United have to do with anything? Is that your way of dealing with the fact that some players are better than others, and that perhaps some levels of play may be innapropriate? That's not insulting anyone.

He didn't need one of his parents to take the fun out of it for him. The other families did that when they'd choose not to show up because it was too hot to play a doubleheader, leaving 11 or 12 kids to play a doubleheader on their own. They certainly didn't choose to blow it off because it was high level soccer. And don't reply with the "families are supposed to commit to the duration of the program" crap. They all agree to be part of it, and then all of sudden "things come up".

How you make a leap from that post to assuming I would be on a cell phone or blackberry during vacation is puzzling. You obviously hate people. I hope you soon get to crawl back into whatever hole makes you happy.

What qualifies you to judge that your kid is too good to play with certain players? As a long-time coach the LAST person I would ask to evaluate a player is a parent.

What qualifies YOU to make your judgements based on a post in a forum? Sounds to me like you've been a coach a little too long. If you're that bitter, just go away.......

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:28 PM
[quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.



Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:2ak3kzb0]

Bravo

07-16-2007, 12:34 PM
This is the third summer my son has played district select and he loves it. He has played with some of the best players in the state and has been fortunate to have had a wonderful coach who really loves the game. We feel really fortunate that Mass Youth Soccer runs this program every summer.

Great post and well said. This is someone who gets it. Now compare and contrast to mr. mykidistoogoodfordistricts

Just so I understand it, someone inquired about people's experiences with District in the hopes of soliciting some info, expecting (and hoping) I'm sure to hear the pros and cons, but in Cujo's black-and-white world, if you like Districts, you are good, if you don't, you are an obnoxious snob. And this is completely unrelated to any specific experiences, coaching, fellow teammates, or any other factor that a CHILD may have experienced in determining whether they liked it or didn't or will play again. Okay then, I better sign my kid up right away so that Cujo thinks I'm a nice person and doesn't call me names.

Give me a break.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:36 PM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

So when does your son sign with Man U? Looks like you nipped his having fun in the bud. Nice job.

I love how you say "This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program" and then immediately proceed to insult them. DS is what it is. I bet you are one of those people who spend their whole vacation on the cell phone or crackberry with the office.

What a jerk you are!

What does Manchester United have to do with anything? Is that your way of dealing with the fact that some players are better than others, and that perhaps some levels of play may be innapropriate? That's not insulting anyone.

He didn't need one of his parents to take the fun out of it for him. The other families did that when they'd choose not to show up because it was too hot to play a doubleheader, leaving 11 or 12 kids to play a doubleheader on their own. They certainly didn't choose to blow it off because it was high level soccer. And don't reply with the "families are supposed to commit to the duration of the program" crap. They all agree to be part of it, and then all of sudden "things come up".

How you make a leap from that post to assuming I would be on a cell phone or blackberry during vacation is puzzling. You obviously hate people. I hope you soon get to crawl back into whatever hole makes you happy.

What qualifies you to judge that your kid is too good to play with certain players? As a long-time coach the LAST person I would ask to evaluate a player is a parent.

What qualifies YOU to make your judgements based on a post in a forum? Sounds to me like you've been a coach a little too long. If you're that bitter, just go away.......

I have dealt with lots of parents like you. I have trained hundreds of kids, coached thousands of games, and placed kids in all levels of college play. I never encouraged my players to play ODP since it was demographically and economically red-lined and my kids were mostly urban. ODP are some of the best but certainly not all of the best players in the state. In that way it is no different than MAPLE. DS was great for the urban kids as many of our games were near 128.

MASoccer
07-16-2007, 12:37 PM
I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Never said that DS is a High School prep program. What I said was that DS allows players to keep in somewhat decent shape in a fun, organized way by still playing soccer. There's much more that players need to do in the summer months to be properly conditioned for soccer. That wasn't the point of my post. Bad Habits? Nope hven't seen that at all. If players have good club coaches, players know the right way to play. Four weeks of soccer playing twice a week isn't going to undo good teaching. My son's high school experience has had much more of an impact on bad habits than DS (please, please note that I'm not trying to slight HS coaches, just talking about my son's personal experience.)

It appears that your experiences weren't very good ones, too bad. Your son/ daughter has missed out on a very positive no stress soccer environment.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:39 PM
This is the third summer my son has played district select and he loves it. He has played with some of the best players in the state and has been fortunate to have had a wonderful coach who really loves the game. We feel really fortunate that Mass Youth Soccer runs this program every summer.

Great post and well said. This is someone who gets it. Now compare and contrast to mr. mykidistoogoodfordistricts

Just so I understand it, someone inquired about people's experiences with District in the hopes of soliciting some info, expecting (and hoping) I'm sure to hear the pros and cons, but in Cujo's black-and-white world, if you like Districts, you are good, if you don't, you are an obnoxious snob. And this is completely unrelated to any specific experiences, coaching, fellow teammates, or any other factor that a CHILD may have experienced in determining whether they liked it or didn't or will play again. Okay then, I better sign my kid up right away so that Cujo thinks I'm a nice person and doesn't call me names.

Give me a break.

So you think it is okay to crap on DS coaches and players? What are your qualifications. Standing on the sidelines watching games doesn't count. Not every sports experience needs to produce red-line competition and threshold response in players. It is okay to have a little fun and stay in shape at the same time. The argument that playing with players under your level will hurt your play is utter BS. In the past many good athletes honed their skills in sandlot play with players of all levels. The prime benefit is that there were no adults around to judge things. I feel sorry for you.

07-16-2007, 12:40 PM
[quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:omhfhnev]

Well, BS, at least the name is accurate.

I'm sorry that some feel the post was snobbery. When the kid comes back and says he doesn't want to play because it's no fun having to do all the work while the other players stand around, then that's not snobbery. You all get so upset when anyone tries to point out that there are differing skill levels. What about all those poor teams and kids in MAPLE D? Should we put them in Division one so they have the same opportunites as the Div 1 players? This is ludicrous.

The quality of play was an opinion. Others are happy with the program. Great! They should be part of it!

Conditioning has nothing to do with it. Abnother MAPLE forum stupid comment......FSM for years, and now the US Soccer Academy have been talking about the negative affects on multiple games in one day. Put that in 90 degree heat, and the negative affects are amplified.

No one ever said that the ODP players were the best players in the state. Using ODP player skill level as a benchmark is a waste of time.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 12:47 PM
[quote=BS][quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:2m6r4xpn]

Well, BS, at least the name is accurate.

I'm sorry that some feel the post was snobbery. When the kid comes back and says he doesn't want to play because it's no fun having to do all the work while the other players stand around, then that's not snobbery. You all get so upset when anyone tries to point out that there are differing skill levels. What about all those poor teams and kids in MAPLE D? Should we put them in Division one so they have the same opportunites as the Div 1 players? This is ludicrous.

The quality of play was an opinion. Others are happy with the program. Great! They should be part of it!

Conditioning has nothing to do with it. Abnother MAPLE forum stupid comment......FSM for years, and now the US Soccer Academy have been talking about the negative affects on multiple games in one day. Put that in 90 degree heat, and the negative affects are amplified.

No one ever said that the ODP players were the best players in the state. Using ODP player skill level as a benchmark is a waste of time.[/quote:2m6r4xpn]

It appears that the saying the apple doesn't fall far from the tree applies in your case.

07-16-2007, 12:54 PM
This is the third summer my son has played district select and he loves it. He has played with some of the best players in the state and has been fortunate to have had a wonderful coach who really loves the game. We feel really fortunate that Mass Youth Soccer runs this program every summer.

Great post and well said. This is someone who gets it. Now compare and contrast to mr. mykidistoogoodfordistricts

Just so I understand it, someone inquired about people's experiences with District in the hopes of soliciting some info, expecting (and hoping) I'm sure to hear the pros and cons, but in Cujo's black-and-white world, if you like Districts, you are good, if you don't, you are an obnoxious snob. And this is completely unrelated to any specific experiences, coaching, fellow teammates, or any other factor that a CHILD may have experienced in determining whether they liked it or didn't or will play again. Okay then, I better sign my kid up right away so that Cujo thinks I'm a nice person and doesn't call me names.

Give me a break.

Yup. Just try to disagree with him. You're wrong. And he's happy to tell you. And as a bonus, you'll get to hear how qualified he is, how much he knows, how all parents suck, how kids from wealthy towns suck, and how great he is at what he does.

07-16-2007, 12:57 PM
[quote=Anonymous][quote=BS][quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:2c2hh37w]

Well, BS, at least the name is accurate.

I'm sorry that some feel the post was snobbery. When the kid comes back and says he doesn't want to play because it's no fun having to do all the work while the other players stand around, then that's not snobbery. You all get so upset when anyone tries to point out that there are differing skill levels. What about all those poor teams and kids in MAPLE D? Should we put them in Division one so they have the same opportunites as the Div 1 players? This is ludicrous.

The quality of play was an opinion. Others are happy with the program. Great! They should be part of it!

Conditioning has nothing to do with it. Abnother MAPLE forum stupid comment......FSM for years, and now the US Soccer Academy have been talking about the negative affects on multiple games in one day. Put that in 90 degree heat, and the negative affects are amplified.

No one ever said that the ODP players were the best players in the state. Using ODP player skill level as a benchmark is a waste of time.[/quote:2c2hh37w]

It appears that the saying the apple doesn't fall far from the tree applies in your case.[/quote:2c2hh37w]

I repeat: You are a jerk.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 01:03 PM
[quote=Anonymous][quote=BS][quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).

Well, BS, at least the name is accurate.

I'm sorry that some feel the post was snobbery. When the kid comes back and says he doesn't want to play because it's no fun having to do all the work while the other players stand around, then that's not snobbery. You all get so upset when anyone tries to point out that there are differing skill levels. What about all those poor teams and kids in MAPLE D? Should we put them in Division one so they have the same opportunites as the Div 1 players? This is ludicrous.

The quality of play was an opinion. Others are happy with the program. Great! They should be part of it!

Conditioning has nothing to do with it. Abnother MAPLE forum stupid comment......FSM for years, and now the US Soccer Academy have been talking about the negative affects on multiple games in one day. Put that in 90 degree heat, and the negative affects are amplified.

No one ever said that the ODP players were the best players in the state. Using ODP player skill level as a benchmark is a waste of time.[/quote:f10sv359]

It appears that the saying the apple doesn't fall far from the tree applies in your case.[/quote:f10sv359]

I repeat: You are a jerk.[/quote:f10sv359]

Why? Because I called you out on your post? Nice debating skills BTW. I bet your neighbors love you. I think your post illustrates how casually and thoughtlessly the arrogant soccer parents insult and disrespect players and coaches. It is really sad. I cannot begin to count how many times I have overheard parents criticizing the play of other players within earshot of other parents AND other players. Within a forum like this it is even easier. Unfortunately it seems to come naturally to certain people. Their kids are better than anyone elses, they are smarter, they are more motivated - and the parents are cocksure that the kids will go to the best teams and the best schools and will always be #1. Fortunately these parents are in the minority.

07-16-2007, 01:14 PM
[quote=BS][quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:2085zgix]

Well, BS, at least the name is accurate.

Precisely! Most of what is posted here is just that, BS! Someone finally gets it.

I'm sorry that some feel the post was snobbery. When the kid comes back and says he doesn't want to play because it's no fun having to do all the work while the other players stand around, then that's not snobbery. You all get so upset when anyone tries to point out that there are differing skill levels. What about all those poor teams and kids in MAPLE D? Should we put them in Division one so they have the same opportunites as the Div 1 players? This is ludicrous.

Your comment is ridiculous and makes absolutey no sense. First, it's my kids choice as to whether she plays or not. I'm in a better position than you or some article to understand what she is capable of and how much is enough. When she comes to me and says she's done, that's OK w/ me. My only comment to her is that if she signs up for something, she is obligated to see it through because she took a spot that likely would have gone to someone else.

The quality of play was an opinion. Others are happy with the program. Great! They should be part of it!

It's OK to comment on your experience (good or bad), but don't trash the program as a result of it.

Conditioning has nothing to do with it. Abnother MAPLE forum stupid comment......FSM for years, and now the US Soccer Academy have been talking about the negative affects on multiple games in one day. Put that in 90 degree heat, and the negative affects are amplified.

Stupid because you disagree and not your opinion? Conditioning has everything to do with it. So now that you've thrown FSM under the bus and by your example, maybe they shouldn't be holding the Regional’s or Nationals in Texas this summer and move them to a cooler climate or different time of year.

No one ever said that the ODP players were the best players in the state. Using ODP player skill level as a benchmark is a waste of time.[/quote:2085zgix]

At least we can agree on something.

My point is that each individual has different needs. I've heard others on this forum complain that the season is too short and there be a summer league. If there are those out there that want that, then great for them. If the numbers warrant it, I'm sure someone will create it. Who are we to deny that opportunity which goes for DS as well? Just my opinions.

07-16-2007, 01:34 PM
[quote=Anonymous][quote=BS][quote]I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

You are definitely a snob. We have to separate those "upper level" players from those lowly "town" or average club players. I don't want my club player kid exposed to those nasty habits. God forbid he or she should have fun in a low key environment.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

Too late for that.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

Couldn't take it? My kids just finished a 4 game tournament in RI in 90+ degree heat and never complained a bit. Sounds like your son needed a better conditioning program.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

Thanks for the words of wisdom, maybe they'll forget those nasty bad habits by then.

My kid loves to play and this is better than wasting money on some recreation day camp. She gets good touches on the ball (glorified or not) and a lot of players on the team are from other clubs with the same passion to play. And by the way they are just as good (or better) as many of the ODP players I've seen (subject of another thread).[/quote:izqntxhc]

Well, BS, at least the name is accurate.

Precisely! Most of what is posted here is just that, BS! Someone finally gets it.

I'm sorry that some feel the post was snobbery. When the kid comes back and says he doesn't want to play because it's no fun having to do all the work while the other players stand around, then that's not snobbery. You all get so upset when anyone tries to point out that there are differing skill levels. What about all those poor teams and kids in MAPLE D? Should we put them in Division one so they have the same opportunites as the Div 1 players? This is ludicrous.

Your comment is ridiculous and makes absolutey no sense. First, it's my kids choice as to whether she plays or not. I'm in a better position than you or some article to understand what she is capable of and how much is enough. When she comes to me and says she's done, that's OK w/ me. My only comment to her is that if she signs up for something, she is obligated to see it through because she took a spot that likely would have gone to someone else.

The quality of play was an opinion. Others are happy with the program. Great! They should be part of it!

It's OK to comment on your experience (good or bad), but don't trash the program as a result of it.

Conditioning has nothing to do with it. Abnother MAPLE forum stupid comment......FSM for years, and now the US Soccer Academy have been talking about the negative affects on multiple games in one day. Put that in 90 degree heat, and the negative affects are amplified.

Stupid because you disagree and not your opinion? Conditioning has everything to do with it. So now that you've thrown FSM under the bus and by your example, maybe they shouldn't be holding the Regional’s or Nationals in Texas this summer and move them to a cooler climate or different time of year.

No one ever said that the ODP players were the best players in the state. Using ODP player skill level as a benchmark is a waste of time.

At least we can agree on something.

My point is that each individual has different needs. I've heard others on this forum complain that the season is too short and there be a summer league. If there are those out there that want that, then great for them. If the numbers warrant it, I'm sure someone will create it. Who are we to deny that opportunity which goes for DS as well? Just my opinions.[/quote:izqntxhc][/quote:izqntxhc]

^^^above was mine. Not logged in properly.

07-16-2007, 01:58 PM
Based on this exchange, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

keeper
07-16-2007, 02:01 PM
I can’t believe anyone would make any effort to dis DS soccer. Get a life.

It’s hard to get pick-up games going during the summer and DS offers summer soccer that’s really just about enjoying the game. Warm summer days, parents with picnic baskets, beach blankets and lawn chairs, no stress and a tournament that is always well done, why does that not have any value to some people? It’s a nice program to have as a summer option. Well done MYSA!





.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 02:21 PM
Based on this exchange, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

Why because we call somebody out when they insult players and coaches. Am I supposed to be embarrassed because I defended District Soccer. Sorry but I think that you are way off base. I am tired of the people who think that their kids walk on water and that the youth soccer world exists to serve their needs and their needs alone. This is why I have retired from coaching temporarily and perhaps forever. It stopped being about the kids and became about parents relentlessly pushing their kids agenda at the expense of everyone elses.

The sad part is how casually this person dissed the players and coaches. It was so offhand and carelessly tossed out for consumption. I think he didn't even realize that he was insulting anyone. I would rather be insulted deliberately. I also have found that the more someone needs to talk up their kid as a player that they rarely live up to the self-promotion.

If you cut to the chase - the guys post can be distilled as follows:

1) District coaches and players suck
2) My kid thinks he is too good to play with them
3) I agree with my kid
4) He will therefore not lower himself to play with despite accepting a roster spot

This may be one of the most obnoxious posts yet in this forum.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 02:29 PM
Based on this exchange, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

The Santa Clara coach is holding for you on Line 2. Take the call, will ya!

07-16-2007, 02:40 PM
Based on this exchange, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

Why because we call somebody out when they insult players and coaches. Am I supposed to be embarrassed because I defended District Soccer. Sorry but I think that you are way off base. I am tired of the people who think that their kids walk on water and that the youth soccer world exists to serve their needs and their needs alone. This is why I have retired from coaching temporarily and perhaps forever. It stopped being about the kids and became about parents relentlessly pushing their kids agenda at the expense of everyone elses.

The sad part is how casually this person dissed the players and coaches. It was so offhand and carelessly tossed out for consumption. I think he didn't even realize that he was insulting anyone. I would rather be insulted deliberately. I also have found that the more someone needs to talk up their kid as a player that they rarely live up to the self-promotion.

If you cut to the chase - the guys post can be distilled as follows:

1) District coaches and players suck
2) My kid thinks he is too good to play with them
3) I agree with my kid
4) He will therefore not lower himself to play with despite accepting a roster spot

This may be one of the most obnoxious posts yet in this forum.

Based on this exchange, and your continued insistance to hammer whoever has a different opinion to yours, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope you someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

You've defended the honor of the distict select program, and all who are associated with it. I'm sure Guest gets it. Now, please SHUT UP.

07-16-2007, 02:40 PM
Based on this exchange,[quote] I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

Something we should all look forward to.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.[/quote:2e4v9egh]

We are not the ones trying to tear down the program. The post started with a few individuals who wanted to share their POSITIVE experiences with the DS program, when you launched a hand grenade into the crowd. Now you call us immature and egotistical. I think not.

07-16-2007, 02:52 PM
I am only posting anonymously to protect the innocent, the coach and players, on my sons DS team and my username would give it away if they were to read this. My son is in his second year of DS. Much of what has been posted is accurate in regards to his experience. He and one other boy are very talented and do the greater share of the work on the field. The talent level from there drops sharply. Apparently our district, historically, has had a problem fielding teams. For the second year in a row our team will go winless. There is absolutely no chance of a victory. The coach is a very nice guy and probably a decent town coach. The team has a few club kids, several travel players and a few rec league players. All of the kids are learning, not by what they are doing themselves, but by what they see the other teams doing against them. Some of the other teams have shown mercy and starting playing posession, rather than having blowouts (great training for them). My son takes soccer seriously. He enjoys training and he enjoys winning as much as the next kid. At game one, it was obvious were the season was headed. I knew it would be another long, agonizing winless season. I tried to put a postive spin on things, "You'll get in a good run, Work on some of the things you normally can't." ..... After a 17-0 defeat, followed by a 7-1 defeat this past Saturday, I thought for sure my son would be disheartened enough to quit and end the madness. I asked if he wanted to try something else, he doesn't have to do this.....BIG mistake!... He was actually mad at me for making such a suggestion. He proceeded to tell me he is having ball. These kids are a riot. He enjoys the workload and being the central player on his team. By no means does he want to quit. (I now feel I am a fool for suggesting it) So, needless to say we are in it through the tournament and will probably do it again next year. He's having fun playing the game he loves. That's what matters

Cujo
07-16-2007, 02:53 PM
Based on this exchange, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

Why because we call somebody out when they insult players and coaches. Am I supposed to be embarrassed because I defended District Soccer. Sorry but I think that you are way off base. I am tired of the people who think that their kids walk on water and that the youth soccer world exists to serve their needs and their needs alone. This is why I have retired from coaching temporarily and perhaps forever. It stopped being about the kids and became about parents relentlessly pushing their kids agenda at the expense of everyone elses.

The sad part is how casually this person dissed the players and coaches. It was so offhand and carelessly tossed out for consumption. I think he didn't even realize that he was insulting anyone. I would rather be insulted deliberately. I also have found that the more someone needs to talk up their kid as a player that they rarely live up to the self-promotion.

If you cut to the chase - the guys post can be distilled as follows:

1) District coaches and players suck
2) My kid thinks he is too good to play with them
3) I agree with my kid
4) He will therefore not lower himself to play with despite accepting a roster spot

This may be one of the most obnoxious posts yet in this forum.

Based on this exchange, and your continued insistance to hammer whoever has a different opinion to yours, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope you someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

You've defended the honor of the distict select program, and all who are associated with it. I'm sure Guest gets it. Now, please SHUT UP.

It is one thing to have an opinion but another thing to diss an entire group of players and coaches. If anyone should have kept their mouth shut it is mr.mykidistoogoodfordistricts

Once again, if you think it is an embarassment to defend an organization that provides a nice relaxed venue and frequently some very enjoyable soccer then I think you need to reevaluate yourself. If you say something stupid in this forum expect to get called on it. Then again, if you say something intelligent expect to get called on that too. Toughen up.

Cujo
07-16-2007, 02:58 PM
I am only posting anonymously to protect the innocent, the coach and players, on my sons DS team and my username would give it away if they were to read this. My son is in his second year of DS. Much of what has been posted is accurate in regards to his experience. He and one other boy are very talented and do the greater share of the work on the field. The talent level from there drops sharply. Apparently our district, historically, has had a problem fielding teams. For the second year in a row our team will go winless. There is absolutely no chance of a victory. The coach is a very nice guy and probably a decent town coach. The team has a few club kids, several travel players and a few rec league players. All of the kids are learning, not by what they are doing themselves, but by what they see the other teams doing against them. Some of the other teams have shown mercy and starting playing posession, rather than having blowouts (great training for them). My son takes soccer seriously. He enjoys training and he enjoys winning as much as the next kid. At game one, it was obvious were the season was headed. I knew it would be another long, agonizing winless season. I tried to put a postive spin on things, "You'll get in a good run, Work on some of the things you normally can't." ..... After a 17-0 defeat, followed by a 7-1 defeat this past Saturday, I thought for sure my son would be disheartened enough to quit and end the madness. I asked if he wanted to try something else, he doesn't have to do this.....BIG mistake!... He was actually mad at me for making such a suggestion. He proceeded to tell me he is having ball. These kids are a riot. He enjoys the workload and being the central player on his team. By no means does he want to quit. (I now feel I am a fool for suggesting it) So, needless to say we are in it through the tournament and will probably do it again next year. He's having fun playing the game he loves. That's what matters

Great story. Your kid gets it. Too many parents equate winning with success. I have played on and coached undefeated teams and played on and coached winless teams. There is frequently no correlation between enjoyment and winning. My mens baseball team went 0-14 last year and I had a blast. This year we added some new players who have helped the team out on the field but everybody is miserable. Go figure. I have never played sports solely to win. I always want to win, I always try to win, but I never NEED to win. That is why I am still competing 42 years after I first played competitively.

07-16-2007, 03:17 PM
Based on this exchange,[quote] I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

Something we should all look forward to.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

We are not the ones trying to tear down the program. The post started with a few individuals who wanted to share their POSITIVE experiences with the DS program, when you launched a hand grenade into the crowd. Now you call us immature and egotistical. I think not.[/quote:r1fpeves]

I swore I would't reply to you babies in this thread, but I don't see where anyone asked only for positive opinions of the program.

In typical fashion, people here react to a negative opinion as if their mother was being insulted. So much for a free exchange of opinions or ideas.

07-16-2007, 03:22 PM
I think DS is a waste for the upper level players. Coaching is generally not top notch, and the other kids on the team are usually well below the skill level that the better players play with on their club teams. It's an environment to develop poor habits for the better players. One or two better players per team (if that) does not help too much.

This is not to insult the kids and coaches in the program. And for the money, it's a good value.

My son played DS for a couple of years, and he certainly had a bit of fun. But Saturday doubleheaders and a tournament in 90 degree heat takes its toll.

I disagree with MASoccer about the program's worth in preparing players for HS. The program ends weeks before HS pre-season. If HS preparation is your goal, kids are better off at a quality HS pre-season camp. These programs are specifically geared to HS preparation. DS continues to be glorified town soccer. Most ODP players I know take the summer off because it's the only period of time without club or ODP committments. Remember, ODP ID camp has just recently finished, and ODP tryouts start up again in mid-August.

The author of the above post is clearly talking about skills, not class or economic status. He (or she) clearly knows what he's talking about, and speaks from experience. It's a valuable point of view. At the same time, it doesn't invalidate MASoccer's endorsement of District soccer, or anyone else's.

So there was an exchange of views, and a civil disagreement. But then, along comes Cujo with a different interpretation. Here's one (mercifully short) quote among many:

I have and will always call out people with the attitude that their kids are too good to play with other kids. Parents are the worst evaluators of their kids talent. They should leave that to other people.

Cujo is a maddening mix of insight and resentment. On other threads he says intelligent things about soccer, on this one he starts a fire and then throws gasoline on it. He's always looking for a fight, and he's always quick to assume the worst about other posters.

Here's a quiz: How big is the chip on Cujo's shoulder?

(a) Martha Stewart could throw a snobby garden party on it
(b) Khano Smith couldn't kick a free kick over it
(c) He has to drive with the window rolled down
(d) If it were made of gold, it would be worth $100 million
(e) All of the above

The correct answer is (c).

07-16-2007, 03:45 PM
Based on this exchange, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope yopu someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

Why because we call somebody out when they insult players and coaches. Am I supposed to be embarrassed because I defended District Soccer. Sorry but I think that you are way off base. I am tired of the people who think that their kids walk on water and that the youth soccer world exists to serve their needs and their needs alone. This is why I have retired from coaching temporarily and perhaps forever. It stopped being about the kids and became about parents relentlessly pushing their kids agenda at the expense of everyone elses.

The sad part is how casually this person dissed the players and coaches. It was so offhand and carelessly tossed out for consumption. I think he didn't even realize that he was insulting anyone. I would rather be insulted deliberately. I also have found that the more someone needs to talk up their kid as a player that they rarely live up to the self-promotion.

If you cut to the chase - the guys post can be distilled as follows:

1) District coaches and players suck
2) My kid thinks he is too good to play with them
3) I agree with my kid
4) He will therefore not lower himself to play with despite accepting a roster spot

This may be one of the most obnoxious posts yet in this forum.

Based on this exchange, and your continued insistance to hammer whoever has a different opinion to yours, I would never allow any of my kids to play for you coaches, or with you players.

The way you conduct yourselves is an utter embarrassment to youth soccer. I hope you someday realize how egotistical and immature you all come across.

You've defended the honor of the distict select program, and all who are associated with it. I'm sure Guest gets it. Now, please SHUT UP.

It is one thing to have an opinion but another thing to diss an entire group of players and coaches. If anyone should have kept their mouth shut it is mr.mykidistoogoodfordistricts

Once again, if you think it is an embarassment to defend an organization that provides a nice relaxed venue and frequently some very enjoyable soccer then I think you need to reevaluate yourself. If you say something stupid in this forum expect to get called on it. Then again, if you say something intelligent expect to get called on that too. Toughen up.

No. the embarrassment is how you, and the others, reacted.

If you want to defend the program, then defend it. The references to Man Utd, cell phones, blackberry devices, etc are just taunting.

What is stupid, is your stereotypes of parents. That you should be called on, Mr. IhateparenysandI'mbetterthaneveryone.

justanovicecoach
07-16-2007, 05:17 PM
Hey BS what district does your daughter play for? We played two games this weekend and the play was pretty good (GU13). Not club but much better than town. And we absoutely do not play kick and chase.

07-16-2007, 05:26 PM
I play on a district team and it is a lot of fun. Even though the quality of play isnt top notch i think the teams could give some club teams a run for thier money.

Red van
07-16-2007, 07:10 PM
My turn: 1) I think the adult Guest(s) spewing nastiness anonymously are cowards. Don't you have enough integrity to stand up for what you are saying, even behind a screen name? 2) My son, a Division 1 rising U-16 who has been and is playing for some of the top MAPLE teams, has played ODP, etc, is playing District Select for the 2nd year. His coach is a very dedicated parent who was a very dedicated town coach who takes it seriously. Some of the players on the team are MAPLE div 1 players, some are more recreational players, ie, a wide diversity of skills. It doesn't matter to them about winning -- they're having a ball! They get to play more soccer! My son can work on skills he hasn't had the safety to work on in the highly pressured and competitive club and ODP soccer environments. It's for fun, pure and simple. When he wants high level training in the summer, he will spend time at a serious soccer camp. So let the kids have fun and play without the adults getting into **ssing contest about it -- you make adolescents look positively mature.

newbie
07-17-2007, 08:37 AM
I agree 1000%. Why can't they just play for the fun of it. My son has been playing DS for 3 years. He loves it - it's not as "high quality" as D1, but it's a great combination of playing, competing and having fun while doing so.

At the tryout for his first year in DS I was amazed to see the kids running up and down the field during the scrimmage laughing and joking. One of the dads was freaking out because his kid didn't have his "game face" on; he seemed mad because his kid was smiling when playing soccer. Why do some of you feel that every aspect of the game has to be a competition? I think we all want our kids to learn and grow in the game, but I also want my kid to grow as a human being. Learn how to make new friends, learn how to deal with diversity, and I'd like both my kids to realize that sports are about competing AND about having fun. There are so many life lessons.

Unfortunately many of our lessons in soccer have been about how life isn't fair and how many situations in life are win-lose. DS has been thus far a win-win situation.

07-17-2007, 09:15 AM
Why can't everyone stop freaking out?

Many kids have fun in DS. Great. They should play. That's what it's for.

For others, DS doesn't give them what they are looking for. So they don't play. Either scenario is OK. Can't we just leave everyone alone to make their decisions without bashing them for it?

No one suggested abolishing the program. If you like it, then play. If you don't, then find sonething else to do.

07-17-2007, 09:19 AM
My turn: 1) I think the adult Guest(s) spewing nastiness anonymously are cowards. Don't you have enough integrity to stand up for what you are saying, even behind a screen name? 2) My son, a Division 1 rising U-16 who has been and is playing for some of the top MAPLE teams, has played ODP, etc, is playing District Select for the 2nd year. His coach is a very dedicated parent who was a very dedicated town coach who takes it seriously. Some of the players on the team are MAPLE div 1 players, some are more recreational players, ie, a wide diversity of skills. It doesn't matter to them about winning -- they're having a ball! They get to play more soccer! My son can work on skills he hasn't had the safety to work on in the highly pressured and competitive club and ODP soccer environments. It's for fun, pure and simple. When he wants high level training in the summer, he will spend time at a serious soccer camp. So let the kids have fun and play without the adults getting into **ssing contest about it -- you make adolescents look positively mature.


I usually just read in this forum, but once in a great while feel the need to contribute. I also have a child playing in DS. Of my three children, this is the first who has played in this league. I will start by saying that he is a D1, ODP, blah, blah, blah player, so I am aware of the differences in the levels of play. Listen, we knew when we signed up for this that it wasn't going to be Region 1 play - however, I will tell you that we were pleasantly surprised and find it enjoyable. My child is playing with a handful of players that he played with in the past and a bunch of kids that he played against for years. We are also seeing parents that we may not have seen in a while from the other teams. They are having a good time and I have not seen any "major" bad habits developing out there. A few summer games shouldn't be able to erase years of the fine training my child has recieved. The coach is a nice fellow (the kids all seem to like him) and the parents on the sidelines are very nice. Thus far, it's been a good decision as he is getting touches on the ball during the summer. Like someone else has said, just take it for what it is. If you want a high level camp, this is not where you should be.

I do have to agree that the only drawback is that the scheduling seems to go against what US soccer is trying to do and that is limit the amount of games that the kids have to play in one day. At least when you have a game or two to rest, it isn't too bad. I believe US Soccer is saying that the players need at least 24 hours from one game to the next to have their bodies rest. However, the back to back game that everyone will have to endure is tough and was my only worry. Needless to say it is the game that every team seems to struggle with. I think MA youth has done a good job with this but should consider a different schedule for the back to back games.

07-17-2007, 09:21 AM
My turn: 1) I think the adult Guest(s) spewing nastiness anonymously are cowards. Don't you have enough integrity to stand up for what you are saying, even behind a screen name? 2) My son, a Division 1 rising U-16 who has been and is playing for some of the top MAPLE teams, has played ODP, etc, is playing District Select for the 2nd year. His coach is a very dedicated parent who was a very dedicated town coach who takes it seriously. Some of the players on the team are MAPLE div 1 players, some are more recreational players, ie, a wide diversity of skills. It doesn't matter to them about winning -- they're having a ball! They get to play more soccer! My son can work on skills he hasn't had the safety to work on in the highly pressured and competitive club and ODP soccer environments. It's for fun, pure and simple. When he wants high level training in the summer, he will spend time at a serious soccer camp. So let the kids have fun and play without the adults getting into **ssing contest about it -- you make adolescents look positively mature.


I usually just read in this forum, but once in a great while feel the need to contribute. I also have a child playing in DS. Of my three children, this is the first who has played in this league. I will start by saying that he is a D1, ODP, blah, blah, blah player, so I am aware of the differences in the levels of play. Listen, we knew when we signed up for this that it wasn't going to be Region 1 play - however, I will tell you that we were pleasantly surprised and find it enjoyable. My child is playing with a handful of players that he played with in the past and a bunch of kids that he played against for years. We are also seeing parents that we may not have seen in a while from the other teams. They are having a good time and I have not seen any "major" bad habits developing out there. A few summer games shouldn't be able to erase years of the fine training my child has recieved. The coach is a nice fellow (the kids all seem to like him) and the parents on the sidelines are very nice. Thus far, it's been a good decision as he is getting touches on the ball during the summer. Like someone else has said, just take it for what it is. If you want a high level camp, this is not where you should be.

I do have to agree that the only drawback is that the scheduling seems to go against what US soccer is trying to do and that is limit the amount of games that the kids have to play in one day. At least when you have a game or two to rest, it isn't too bad. I believe US Soccer is saying that the players need at least 24 hours from one game to the next to have their bodies rest. However, the back to back game that everyone will have to endure is tough and was my only worry. Needless to say it is the game that every team seems to struggle with. I think MA youth has done a good job with this but should consider a different schedule for the back to back games.

07-17-2007, 10:04 AM
Have not done District Select in a few years but the 'two games back to back' USED to be moderated by the fact that the games were not the same length as players were used to playing. At that time, it came out to about same length as 1.5 'regular length' games.

interested

MASoccer
07-17-2007, 12:18 PM
Have not done District Select in a few years but the 'two games back to back' USED to be moderated by the fact that the games were not the same length as players were used to playing. At that time, it came out to about same length as 1.5 'regular length' games.

interested

Good point the games are only 30 minute halves for the U15 age group. Normally they play 40 minute halves in a game. This equates to 20 minutes less per game. Overall it's really just an additional half. Of course the argument can be made that in 90+ degree weather this is not favorable, and for the most part I agree. Luckily, my son's team has had most of the players present each game so substitutions are readily available and halftimes are extended when needed. Also, in the past referees have limited halves to less than thirty minutes during the pre-tournament games if the weather is that overbearing or teams are short players.

Again, this is non-competitive league so for both of my son's this has meant a no pressure to win situation. Both have been very fortunate to have coaches that "get" that concept and players have responded well in the many years we've been associated with DS.

Again, to each their own, for both my sons, however, they cannot say enough about it. Something they truly look forward to each summer.

07-17-2007, 02:41 PM
Where did DS come from? Was it an old league or?

MASoccer
07-17-2007, 03:33 PM
Where did DS come from? Was it an old league or?

I believe the original premise of DS was to set it up as a feeder system for ODP. Obviously, this is quite removed from that concept now, but I do remember when my first son did DS that was the idea.

07-17-2007, 05:35 PM
back perhaps 10-12 years ago, the current 'district select' WAS ODP. they split off a few years back when the state decided that there was a better way to identify and train odp teams. note that 'districts' are run through the RECREATIONAL side of the house.

interested.

beentheredonethat
07-17-2007, 09:31 PM
note that 'districts' are run through the RECREATIONAL side of the house.


And that would be a bad thing? I for one am glad that that pompous group that runs ODP has nothing to do with this.

Vman971
07-17-2007, 09:42 PM
My oldest daughter played DS for 2 seasons for District 2 about 5 years ago. As a GU14, she really had a lot of fun, the quality of play wasn't bad at all, and she made a lot of friends, some of whom she still stays in touch with and they always had a full squad.

As a GU15, they struggled to field enough players on game day and even though she enjoyed playing, it wasn't as much fun as it was the year before and she decided that she didn't want to do it as a GU16.

I asked her about it the other day and she still remembers the fun times she had with the teams and shared some of the stories from the tournament about her and the players and some of the stuff they did. Seeing her smile about it 5 years later convinces me it was money well spent. Believe it or not, sometimes there is more to being on a soccer team than just soccer.

beentheredonethat
07-17-2007, 09:52 PM
I asked her about it the other day and she still remembers the fun times she had with the teams and shared some of the stories from the tournament about her and the players and some of the stuff they did. Seeing her smile about it 5 years later convinces me it was money well spent. Believe it or not, sometimes there is more to being on a soccer team than just soccer.

The passion that it takes to do the work necessary to be truly good at a sport has to come from some place other than the thrill of victory. In this club environment it seems like there are so few opportunities to just play for the sake of playing. Situations like described above are way more valuable to the career of a young athlete than most parents think.

07-18-2007, 06:48 AM
note that 'districts' are run through the RECREATIONAL side of the house.


And that would be a bad thing? I for one am glad that that pompous group that runs ODP has nothing to do with this.

A bit grumpy, are we? Where did I say that it was 'a bad thing'? I simply answered a question which required a differentiation between the ODP side and the RECREATIONAL side.

And actually I've always found the ODP people to be a bit more reasonable than Nancy Hart et al but peerhaps that it just me.

interested

Red99
07-18-2007, 07:42 AM
One of my daughters (she plays ODP now) looked into Districts a few years ago - the first year she was told the team was completely full and there was no room even for a guest player, the second year she was told they were not fielding a team due to lack of interested players. We didn't move, same region, same coach, so after that we gave up.

07-18-2007, 07:54 AM
My son is also Div1,ODP...he loves district and in addition to having fun, is challenging himself by playing a new position and working on his "left" foot. I like that he isn't on the couch playing PS2 all afternoon on a Sunday!

07-18-2007, 09:10 AM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

MASoccer
07-18-2007, 11:43 AM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

Well Put! :)

Cujo
07-18-2007, 11:50 AM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

Well Put! :)

Well, the reality is that 99% of the coaches and clubs are chasing those 1%. 90% are chasing the 10%. This creates enormous difficulty for the players and families of those who are perceived or projected to be outside those percentages. (Disclaimer: This is called hyperbole and Cujo makes no representations that the percentages cited have been achieved by scientific means and as such cannot provide a warranty on the data provided and assumes no liability for use of such representation).

07-18-2007, 04:55 PM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

I must disagree with this assessment. As a parent/coach of a D1 player at a very successful (multi state cups) club I feel I can fairly evaluate the DS talent. It is not even close to the 90th percentile. I am familiar with the U13,14 and 16 programs and every single one would get throttled by a top D! team, solidly beaten by top D2 teams and compete with better D teams.

This is not for kids looking to improve their game dramatically. This is the reason why many kids on top level clubs choose to not play, much like they do not play ODP. How many Stars and SC girls play on DS? Not many.

That being said, it is a great deal of fun for the kid and parents who can check their egos and play with kids of varying abilities. I like it for me and my daughter. It is great for kids going to play HS soccer as it allows them to play with kids who may not play year round highly organized soccer.

07-18-2007, 07:37 PM
while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

...

I must disagree with this assessment. As a parent/coach of a D1 player at a very successful (multi state cups) club I feel I can fairly evaluate the DS talent. It is not even close to the 90th percentile. I am familiar with the U13,14 and 16 programs and every single one would get throttled by a top D! team, solidly beaten by top D2 teams and compete with better D teams...


You bet; most of these teams would be clobbered by a MAPLE D1 team. Realize too that a MAPLE team is, on average, about 6 months older than a district team. District4 and District5 would usually play a MAPLE D2 team close.

I guess this is really part of my point about how many players and children "get left behind". I also guess i should have thought more/been more explicit about 95th percentile of what cohort.

I don't think 5% of "in-town" rec players play at "district" level; that would be one per team. Not even remotely close.

I don't think 5% of "travel" (i.e. BAYS, ECYSA, etc.) players play at "district" level; that would also be about one per team. Not even close.

I do think more than 5%, 10%, or even 50% or more of MAPLE players play at "district" level.

So, when i said 95th percentile, i guess i meant "serious" (i.e. of travel and higher league) players.

With this clarification, i stand by my 95th percentile "assertion".

The thought that district play is not even 90th percentile shows how many children, potential players, advocates, and fans, are left out of the thoughts of so many of the people most knowledgeable about the game.

Even for the majority the "99th percentile players", the only place their soccer playing goes is to develop (hopefully) a lifelong passion for the game and appreciation of the "power of a team". The very same lessons that can, and should be available to so many more.

If I could come back, and do it all over again, that's the problem I'd try to fix.

Cujo
07-18-2007, 07:56 PM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

I must disagree with this assessment. As a parent/coach of a D1 player at a very successful (multi state cups) club I feel I can fairly evaluate the DS talent. It is not even close to the 90th percentile. I am familiar with the U13,14 and 16 programs and every single one would get throttled by a top D! team, solidly beaten by top D2 teams and compete with better D teams.

This is not for kids looking to improve their game dramatically. This is the reason why many kids on top level clubs choose to not play, much like they do not play ODP. How many Stars and SC girls play on DS? Not many.

That being said, it is a great deal of fun for the kid and parents who can check their egos and play with kids of varying abilities. I like it for me and my daughter. It is great for kids going to play HS soccer as it allows them to play with kids who may not play year round highly organized soccer.

Hmmmn - the DS my daughter played for were comprised of d2 and Maple D players. Not sure how they would be throttled by a Maple D team unless they did it to themselves.

Cujo
07-18-2007, 08:02 PM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

I must disagree with this assessment. As a parent/coach of a D1 player at a very successful (multi state cups) club I feel I can fairly evaluate the DS talent. It is not even close to the 90th percentile. I am familiar with the U13,14 and 16 programs and every single one would get throttled by a top D! team, solidly beaten by top D2 teams and compete with better D teams.

This is not for kids looking to improve their game dramatically. This is the reason why many kids on top level clubs choose to not play, much like they do not play ODP. How many Stars and SC girls play on DS? Not many.

That being said, it is a great deal of fun for the kid and parents who can check their egos and play with kids of varying abilities. I like it for me and my daughter. It is great for kids going to play HS soccer as it allows them to play with kids who may not play year round highly organized soccer.

Must be kinda like what happens when Big Papi shows up to play tball in the hood!!! :)

Blue Devil
07-18-2007, 10:28 PM
No one has to play DS. But if they choose to play - every one can enjoy and benefit from DS play. Even if your child is a very strong D1 player they can still benefit just by having fun and making new friends amid a lower pressure environment.

They also get to try positions and moves that they wouldn't get to try in Maple or Region 1. A great goalie on one of our teams played up front one year and loved having the chance to try and score. She mentioned that it was fun to see how the game looked and how she thought from that side of the ball and it was also great perspective on when and how the net was exposed.

Why wouldn't an outside back love to have a try at center mid or having the chance to take free kicks that they might not get to take in Maple? What about perfecting new moves against lower pressure defense?

I think that the best soccer players are the ones who can learn something from games at every level. If a player is really that much better can't they learn from showing their skills to interested team-mates? I know that often when I need to break down a technique or drill to demonstrate to others it often causes me to learn a subtlety that I would not have learned otherwise. This happens even when I have done the same explanation in the past. Do others coaches or players have that same experience?

07-19-2007, 07:14 AM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

I must disagree with this assessment. As a parent/coach of a D1 player at a very successful (multi state cups) club I feel I can fairly evaluate the DS talent. It is not even close to the 90th percentile. I am familiar with the U13,14 and 16 programs and every single one would get throttled by a top D! team, solidly beaten by top D2 teams and compete with better D teams.

This is not for kids looking to improve their game dramatically. This is the reason why many kids on top level clubs choose to not play, much like they do not play ODP. How many Stars and SC girls play on DS? Not many.

That being said, it is a great deal of fun for the kid and parents who can check their egos and play with kids of varying abilities. I like it for me and my daughter. It is great for kids going to play HS soccer as it allows them to play with kids who may not play year round highly organized soccer.

Hmmmn - the DS my daughter played for were comprised of d2 and Maple D players. Not sure how they would be throttled by a Maple D team unless they did it to themselves.

the post you refer to says they would be throttled by a D1 team, the error was when I hit the shift button making D! instead of D1......my error..........of course I do think that if you read the entire passage you would have surmised this as I did progress from D! to D2 to D..........perhaps you were too busy looking for confrontation ......AGAIN

ontheball
07-19-2007, 07:44 AM
Kids play DS because they love to play soccer. Period. It really isn't that complicated. Adults overanalyze everything. Remember when we were kids and we actually did things just for the fun of it? (And our parents weren't involved)

Cujo
07-19-2007, 08:37 AM
a couple of my children have played ds for a few years. all around, some of those seasons have been the "best" soccer experience for them.

while not having the 99th percentile of players, it probably is the 95th. the quality of play is usually rather good. (ymmv by district)

relatively skilled players, with reasonable parents, playing for fun; what's wrong with that? tailgates, little yelling at the ref, and a chance to play ... if one thinks that's a bad program, well, each to their own.

btw, seems like way too much effort, time, and angst is spent on the (supposedly) top 1% (or less, ided as young teenagers) - to the detriment of the top 5 and 10 percent (let alone the masses of recreational players), most of whom will, and do develop basic skills, a passion for the game, and a lifelong sport if they stay with it. instead, all the crap drives many away. just like many of the comments here about this program ...

I must disagree with this assessment. As a parent/coach of a D1 player at a very successful (multi state cups) club I feel I can fairly evaluate the DS talent. It is not even close to the 90th percentile. I am familiar with the U13,14 and 16 programs and every single one would get throttled by a top D! team, solidly beaten by top D2 teams and compete with better D teams.

This is not for kids looking to improve their game dramatically. This is the reason why many kids on top level clubs choose to not play, much like they do not play ODP. How many Stars and SC girls play on DS? Not many.

That being said, it is a great deal of fun for the kid and parents who can check their egos and play with kids of varying abilities. I like it for me and my daughter. It is great for kids going to play HS soccer as it allows them to play with kids who may not play year round highly organized soccer.

Hmmmn - the DS my daughter played for were comprised of d2 and Maple D players. Not sure how they would be throttled by a Maple D team unless they did it to themselves.

the post you refer to says they would be throttled by a D1 team, the error was when I hit the shift button making D! instead of D1......my error..........of course I do think that if you read the entire passage you would have surmised this as I did progress from D! to D2 to D..........perhaps you were too busy looking for confrontation ......AGAIN

Nope just trying to offer a counterview to an opinion that did not make sense. changing the ! to 1 makes all the difference in the world. That makes it a reasonable statement. My god I have never seen so many whiney insecure wusses in a forum in my life. I get the crap kicked out of me in here all day because I take stances that are not popular among parents but you don't hear me whining. You can't all be that insecure. Do you go through life thinking that everybody is going to agree with you just because it is YOUR opinion? Some of you really need to toughen up. I am challenging opinions and statements and not you. There is a difference.

pitch420
07-19-2007, 08:38 AM
Kids play DS because they love to play soccer. Period. It really isn't that complicated. Adults overanalyze everything. Remember when we were kids and we actually did things just for the fun of it? (And our parents weren't involved)

Playing 'Chase'
Marbles
Riding bikes
Walking to the candy store
Street hockey
Tennis ball/half ball
Skating
Fishing
Climbing a tree
Flashlight tag

Cujo
07-19-2007, 08:42 AM
Kids play DS because they love to play soccer. Period. It really isn't that complicated. Adults overanalyze everything. Remember when we were kids and we actually did things just for the fun of it? (And our parents weren't involved)

I wonder if some parents have conflicting emotions about whether or not to put district play on their kids sports resume. I would assume that it would be more likely to be a conundrum for the parent of a D1 player than a Maple D player. What about D2. This is a legit question BTW - I am not trying to bait anyone into confrontation.

Cujo
07-19-2007, 08:46 AM
Kids play DS because they love to play soccer. Period. It really isn't that complicated. Adults overanalyze everything. Remember when we were kids and we actually did things just for the fun of it? (And our parents weren't involved)

Playing 'Chase'
Marbles
Riding bikes
Walking to the candy store
Street hockey
Tennis ball/half ball
Skating
Fishing
Climbing a tree
Flashlight tag

playing army
whiffle ball
hide and seek
catching frogs (I think this helped me develop lightning fast reaction time and eye hand coordination)
badminton at family cookouts
flipping baseballs cards (leaners win the pot)
playing cards in bike spokes


ahhh nostalgia for a simpler time.......

07-19-2007, 09:16 AM
As to Cujo's question I think the simple answer is that if the decide to play and enjoyed the experience they will place it on their resume. If they had a bad experience they probably wouldn't. I happen to like the idea of what district select had become and was not in favor of allowing ODP players into the program. Not because I have an issue with ODP players (or their parents) but because I thought it signaled a philosophical program change to re-integrate what had become a series of fun but competitive regional friendlies into the more rigid pyramid structure of MYSA. In this respect Cujo's question is very valid because my concern is that the District Select program not become just another resume builder for the top 7-10% of players interested in college playing opportunities. The only issue I have regarding the descriptions being made of the current state of Districts is that it should not be equated with the type of spontaneous unorganized activities that our children get so little of these days. It has costs, try-outs, schedules, travel and adult supervision and leadership. It may be more "fun-based" than some other adult organized and run activities but it isn't ten kids getting together down at the park and bucking up for teams.

Cujo
07-19-2007, 09:46 AM
As to Cujo's question I think the simple answer is that if the decide to play and enjoyed the experience they will place it on their resume. If they had a bad experience they probably wouldn't. I happen to like the idea of what district select had become and was not in favor of allowing ODP players into the program. Not because I have an issue with ODP players (or their parents) but because I thought it signaled a philosophical program change to re-integrate what had become a series of fun but competitive regional friendlies into the more rigid pyramid structure of MYSA. In this respect Cujo's question is very valid because my concern is that the District Select program not become just another resume builder for the top 7-10% of players interested in college playing opportunities. The only issue I have regarding the descriptions being made of the current state of Districts is that it should not be equated with the type of spontaneous unorganized activities that our children get so little of these days. It has costs, try-outs, schedules, travel and adult supervision and leadership. It may be more "fun-based" than some other adult organized and run activities but it isn't ten kids getting together down at the park and bucking up for teams.

Good points - I think the proper way to describe it is sandlot atmosphere within an organized context. The two can coexist.

keeper
07-19-2007, 09:57 AM
I wonder if some parents have conflicting emotions about whether or not to put district play on their kids sports resume. I would assume that it would be more likely to be a conundrum for the parent of a D1 player than a Maple D player. What about D2. This is a legit question BTW - I am not trying to bait anyone into confrontation.

What resume are you talking about?



.

07-19-2007, 10:06 AM
playing army
whiffle ball
hide and seek
catching frogs (I think this helped me develop lightning fast reaction time and eye hand coordination)
badminton at family cookouts
flipping baseballs cards (leaners win the pot)
playing cards in bike spokes


ahhh nostalgia for a simpler time.......

Flipping cards!! good call.

riles
07-19-2007, 12:24 PM
The current discussion regarding organized sandlot games / pick up games prompted me to share what I am currently doing at the fields near my home ( I actually just returned from the fields an 1/2 hour ago). Last week I sent out the following email:
Hello Everyone,
I hope everybody is enjoying their summer so far. To feed my own selfish need to see kids playing soccer, I just wanted to drop a quick note and invite the kids up to the fields at Central on Monday and Thursday mornings from 9 -12 for some pick up soccer games. My own son and a few of his friends try to get to the fields and play, fairly regularly. Often this involves a number of phone calls and coordination and many times doesn't happen. With that in mind, I figure if the kids know that there is time when there will be other kids up there to play with, it eliminates the need for all the phone calls .
My role in this will be supervisory only. I have set up a few fields for small sided games. We can make up teams based on who shows up. I will keep time during the games so the kids are forced into water breaks and we can switch up opponents. I will bring up water and ice as a back up but everyone should bring their own drinks and snack. I will keep and eye on things and make sure everyone is getting along. I am NOT coaching or reffing. This just for FUN, plain and simple, go out and play. The kids have a chance to be creative with their soccer, hone their skills and just have a good time and be kids.
If they can make it on Mondays and not Thursdays, thats fine.Thursdays and not Mondays, thats fine. If they miss a week or two that's fine too. It's just something to do if they have the time. I plan to do this through the rest of the summer. We will not do it during the week of August 6-10th as MLS Camp will be taking place on the fields. I would like to open this up to ages 11-14, boys and girls. That's really just an easier age group for me keep an eye on.If younger kids come I am sure I can set something up with them also. Anyone is welcome... youth players,travel, club, whoever. It's for FUN. Please spread the word. Out of town friends are welcome also. I have posted the directions to Central Field below.
We'll start this, this coming Monday 7/16. I hope to see your there!

Your Friend in Soccer,
Riles

On Monday and today I had 20 kids show up. I broke them up into 4 teams of 5. They played about 5 -twenty minute games. Occasionally I switched up teams based on abilities. They played small sided the whole time with one 10v10 for the last 20 minutes. They played. They laughed. The great players showed off. The good players challenged them. The others learned from what they saw. Did I say, They Had Fun! It was absolutely, without a doubt awesome! Many have said that they are going to tell their friends. The more the better!

Cujo
07-19-2007, 01:14 PM
I wonder if some parents have conflicting emotions about whether or not to put district play on their kids sports resume. I would assume that it would be more likely to be a conundrum for the parent of a D1 player than a Maple D player. What about D2. This is a legit question BTW - I am not trying to bait anyone into confrontation.

What resume are you talking about?



.

Some players choose to put together a sports resume listing their experiences and achievements. Sometimes it is a part of a regular resume. A lot of employers like to see what you have done on an extracurricular basis. I have been a hiring manager for 25 years and my experience is that prospective employees with strong athletic experience have a level of discipline and devotion that may be lacking in other candidates. When I am interviewing people I can tell frequently who has played athletics or has a military background. I am more inclined to hire these types of applicants. For example: I had three applicants for a summer internship in my office. The edge went to a college student with 2 years of college lacrosse under her belt. My experience as a manager is that athletes are usually better employees. My personal recommendation to young people is don't be afraid to list your achievements in sports.

As someone if I recall correctly will be entering the job market soon (you must be a jr or sr in college by now) my advice is to not be bashful about listing your athletic achievements on your resume. Listing your college coach as a reference is a good thing to. I like to see that on a resume and will call the coach. Many successful business people are former athletes and they have a preference in hiring athletes. Doing this may not help but it certainly won't hurt.

Disclaimer: If you are going into interior design or decorating none of my above comments are relevant.

Cujo
07-19-2007, 01:15 PM
playing army
whiffle ball
hide and seek
catching frogs (I think this helped me develop lightning fast reaction time and eye hand coordination)
badminton at family cookouts
flipping baseballs cards (leaners win the pot)
playing cards in bike spokes


ahhh nostalgia for a simpler time.......

Flipping cards!! good call.

Do you have any idea of how many 64 Topps Mickey Mantle cards that I ruined that way? I must have had about $5,000 worth of baseball cards in my bicycle spokes.

07-19-2007, 09:00 PM
I wonder if some parents have conflicting emotions about whether or not to put district play on their kids sports resume. I would assume that it would be more likely to be a conundrum for the parent of a D1 player than a Maple D player. What about D2. This is a legit question BTW - I am not trying to bait anyone into confrontation.

What resume are you talking about?



.

Some players choose to put together a sports resume listing their experiences and achievements. Sometimes it is a part of a regular resume. A lot of employers like to see what you have done on an extracurricular basis. I have been a hiring manager for 25 years and my experience is that prospective employees with strong athletic experience have a level of discipline and devotion that may be lacking in other candidates. When I am interviewing people I can tell frequently who has played athletics or has a military background. I am more inclined to hire these types of applicants. For example: I had three applicants for a summer internship in my office. The edge went to a college student with 2 years of college lacrosse under her belt. My experience as a manager is that athletes are usually better employees. My personal recommendation to young people is don't be afraid to list your achievements in sports.

As someone if I recall correctly will be entering the job market soon (you must be a jr or sr in college by now) my advice is to not be bashful about listing your athletic achievements on your resume. Listing your college coach as a reference is a good thing to. I like to see that on a resume and will call the coach. Many successful business people are former athletes and they have a preference in hiring athletes. Doing this may not help but it certainly won't hurt.

Disclaimer: If you are going into interior design or decorating none of my above comments are relevant.

real nice. you have shown all of your class by whacking the many successful atheletes that go into those fields. not that it was needed after your treatise on parents prior. Please head back to wherever you came from and leave us non-neanderthals (sp?) alone.

interested.

Cujo
07-20-2007, 09:26 AM
I wonder if some parents have conflicting emotions about whether or not to put district play on their kids sports resume. I would assume that it would be more likely to be a conundrum for the parent of a D1 player than a Maple D player. What about D2. This is a legit question BTW - I am not trying to bait anyone into confrontation.

What resume are you talking about?



.

Some players choose to put together a sports resume listing their experiences and achievements. Sometimes it is a part of a regular resume. A lot of employers like to see what you have done on an extracurricular basis. I have been a hiring manager for 25 years and my experience is that prospective employees with strong athletic experience have a level of discipline and devotion that may be lacking in other candidates. When I am interviewing people I can tell frequently who has played athletics or has a military background. I am more inclined to hire these types of applicants. For example: I had three applicants for a summer internship in my office. The edge went to a college student with 2 years of college lacrosse under her belt. My experience as a manager is that athletes are usually better employees. My personal recommendation to young people is don't be afraid to list your achievements in sports.

As someone if I recall correctly will be entering the job market soon (you must be a jr or sr in college by now) my advice is to not be bashful about listing your athletic achievements on your resume. Listing your college coach as a reference is a good thing to. I like to see that on a resume and will call the coach. Many successful business people are former athletes and they have a preference in hiring athletes. Doing this may not help but it certainly won't hurt.

Disclaimer: If you are going into interior design or decorating none of my above comments are relevant.

real nice. you have shown all of your class by whacking the many successful atheletes that go into those fields. not that it was needed after your treatise on parents prior. Please head back to wherever you came from and leave us non-neanderthals (sp?) alone.

interested.

Where is your sense of humour? It was a joke. FYI - my wife is a designer and art school graduate. And hopelessly unathletic.

StillLearning
08-06-2007, 09:09 AM
I don't mean to dredge up an old topic, but I wanted to wait until the end to weigh in on the District Select program.

For my daughter, it was a great experience. She loved having the chance to play on the same team as the girls she has played against. She made some new friends and had a ton of fun.

Was the level of play the same as her club play? No, but she was challenged in different ways. Playing different positions, playing different formations, learning to play with players of differing skill levels and playing for a coach who didn't know her.

Her team didn't do so well during the 12 game season (I think they were 2-8-2) but they put it all together and had a great run in the tournament beating teams that had trounced them previously before bowing out in the semi finals.

Her coach had a very passive approach to the program. No practices, just show up on game day ready to play. They always had their full roster present at every game and from what I could tell, the playing time was pretty equal for all.

Game after game I saw nothing but smiling faces and girls having fun playing soccer. My daughter is already looking forward to next year.

08-06-2007, 10:31 AM
Imagine that! Kids playing soccer simply for the fun of it.

Cujo
08-06-2007, 10:56 AM
I don't mean to dredge up an old topic, but I wanted to wait until the end to weigh in on the District Select program.

For my daughter, it was a great experience. She loved having the chance to play on the same team as the girls she has played against. She made some new friends and had a ton of fun.

Was the level of play the same as her club play? No, but she was challenged in different ways. Playing different positions, playing different formations, learning to play with players of differing skill levels and playing for a coach who didn't know her.

Her team didn't do so well during the 12 game season (I think they were 2-8-2) but they put it all together and had a great run in the tournament beating teams that had trounced them previously before bowing out in the semi finals.

Her coach had a very passive approach to the program. No practices, just show up on game day ready to play. They always had their full roster present at every game and from what I could tell, the playing time was pretty equal for all.

Game after game I saw nothing but smiling faces and girls having fun playing soccer. My daughter is already looking forward to next year.

Nice post and a gentle reminder that it always should primarily be "for the love of the game"..... at any age.....

beentheredonethat
08-07-2007, 04:51 PM
Does anyone know what the results from this past weekend were. I saw a lot of pretty competitive games being played on other fields and am interested in the results. I know in the GU16 final District 6 beat District 3, 2-1.

Vman971
08-07-2007, 07:05 PM
Does anyone know what the results from this past weekend were. I saw a lot of pretty competitive games being played on other fields and am interested in the results. I know in the GU16 final District 6 beat District 3, 2-1.


The results are on the MYSA website under tournaments.



http://www.mayouthsoccer.org/pages/75_d ... select.cfm (http://www.mayouthsoccer.org/pages/75_district_select.cfm)