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FSM
05-29-2007, 09:14 AM
Things seem to be changing very rapidly and as usual it appears So Cal is at the forefront. Here's the latest:

ISC ANNOUNCES ACADEMY STRUCTURE
May 26 2007 - BDL

On Friday night, May 18th, the Irvine Strikers Board of Directors and Director of Coaching Don Ebert announced to all the players and families the creation of the ISC Academy beginning in June of 2007. This new structure will allow all the players to pursue their goals and dreams of playing soccer at the highest levels that their abilities allow by eliminating the pay to play model that exists in most youth clubs today. Players that play on the three oldest girls and boys teams in the club will not have to pay the club fees for the year. In addition, the club announced a ramped up training schedule for all the teams that will provide all the players with the training frequency and training structure that will keep ISC players on par with other top clubs across the country and around the world. "We just felt that we wanted to place player development at the forefront of our club and the one thing that always get in the way of true player development is a pay to play model. We wanted to create an environment where players have to bring their best in terms of effort, attitude and commitment every day so that they can achieve their desired goals. And those goals have not changed, we will continue to place players in colleges across the country as well as professional clubs both domestically and internationally" said DOC Don Ebert.

Ebert pointed to key strategic alliances that made this Academy dream become a reality. "There is no way we could have achieved this without having great partners like Nike Soccer and U.S.F.C. (United States Football Club) that shared our vision and our ultimate player goals. Nike Soccer and U.S.F.C. have first class people in their management group and we will do everything we can to make sure we reward their trust in our club" said Ebert. Irv Chase, President of the Irvine Strikers Soccer Club had this to say about the announcement, "Since its inception, some twenty years ago, the Irvine Soccer Club has strived to be a leader in the competitive youth soccer world through player development and training. The “academizationâ€￾ of ISC’s three oldest boys and girls’ teams is the next logical step in the Club’s goal to insure player development and training excellence and perhaps, most importantly, provide a place for those exceptional players who want to push themselves to the highest level possible through innovative training and intense competition.

The Academy is just the starting point of providing elite player development according to Ebert. "We have mirrored our training schedule to match what youth clubs in Europe and around the world do. I figure if it is good enough for players in youth Academies in Holland, Germany, Belgium and others, it has to be good enough for our players. We will increase training to four days a week in the summer and before National and State Cup competitions, we will train three days a week during the season, we will implement a high school alternative program for players that don't have a quality high school program to attend, we have aligned ourselves with a PDL team so our Academy players can train and compete against current college players, our players will have the opportunities to train overseas and be evaluated by international clubs here at home during different times of the year. We can now offer all our players these different options while at the same time; relieving families of the ever-growing financial pressure of having their kids participate in competitive soccer. We now feel that we can properly prepare all our players both on and off the field to be successful in both college and beyond and that is the sole reason for the creation of the ISC Academy".

For the upcoming 2007-08 season, the Girls U-16, U-17 and U-18 teams will be Academy teams and the Boys U-15, U-16 and U-18 teams will be Academy teams.

05-29-2007, 11:07 AM
There is no way we could have achieved this without having great partners like Nike Soccer and U.S.F.C. (United States Football Club) that shared our vision and our ultimate player goals.

Never heard of USFC until now, so looked up their web site.

http://www.usfcsoccer.com/

So far the clubs involved are Irvine Strikers (So Cal), Scott Gallagher (Missouri), Crossfire Premier (Washington) and PDA (New Jersey), but take a look at the map included on the web site: http://www.usfcsoccer.com/page/?id=108

It looks like they are targeting Texas, Illinois and Massachusetts. Very interesting.

FSM
05-29-2007, 01:39 PM
More info on the changes that are taking place:

http://blog.washingtonpost.com/soccerin ... ative.html (http://blog.washingtonpost.com/soccerinsider/2007/05/ussf_taking_youth_initiative.html)

USSF Taking Youth Initiative

According to documents obtained by the Insider and The Washington Post, the U.S. Soccer Federation's board of directors met last week in Chicago and approved the establishment of a boys' academy program and national youth league to improve American soccer at the teenage level.

The federation plans to identify 60 to 80 youth clubs across the country. Those clubs will then select players from the under-15 and under-18 age groups to participate in the academy, which has been designed to increase the "quality and quantity of training" and "the number of quality games." The USSF hopes to have the program up and running this fall.

According to the federation, up to 2,400 players in each age group will be involved. (Players not on academy teams will continue to participate in traditional club programs.)

Academy teams will have as many as 30 players, train four or five times weekly and play one match per week. The U.S. under-16 national team will play in the academy league and each MLS team will be encouraged to field a team. Academy squads will play opponents in their geographic area during a 36- to 38-game schedule, plus friendlies. National team coaches and scouts will observe games, the USSF stated.

The federation also plans to offer a similiar initiative for female players in the near future.

That is all I have on the program right now. Still a lot of uncertainty about how it will all work. We'll have to wait for the federation's official announcement for more details. At first glance, however, it seems Gulati and the USSF are trying to find a way to expose more players to competitive soccer and expand the youth national team player pools. But will all the elite clubs cooperate? Logistically, can it be done?

FSM
06-05-2007, 05:26 PM
Perhaps we need to somehow merge this thread with the National League thread. Things appear to be changing so fast I am at a loss, there is so much to absorb. Here is some of the latest. Some are speculating this could eliminate such things as ODP and State Cups.

http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewAr ... 57057.html (http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_557057.html)

Federation services
U.S. Soccer Launches Development Academy to Expand Opportunities for Players Nationwide

- Grassroots Development Academy Will Provide Improved Soccer Environment for Thousands of Players, Coaches & Referees from Coast-to-Coast

CHICAGO (June 4, 2007) – In a move designed to improve the development environment for players throughout the country, the U.S. Soccer Federation has taken the initiative in formalizing a nationwide development academy slated to begin in the fall of 2007. The U.S. Soccer Development Academy will begin with up to 80 elite youth soccer clubs from around the country being selected to join the program.

Created to provide players with the best possible opportunity to develop, the U.S. Soccer Development Academy is being initiated after a comprehensive review of player development systems in the United States and around the world.

Each Development Academy club will not only serve as a home for the nation’s top players, but also as a destination point within their community for shared learning and experience. One of the major advantages of the program will see players receiving integrated oversight from both youth club coaches and U.S. Soccer coaches, while training in their home environment. In turn, the Development Academy will provide an improved scouting environment for college, professional and U.S. National Team coaches.

“After completing an extensive review and discussion across the country, we feel that it is the right time for U.S. Soccer to lead a change in the sport at the youth level,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati. “We need to shift the focus of our young elite players from an ‘overburdened, game emphasis’ model to a ‘meaningful training and competition’ model. This will ultimately lead to more success and will allow players to develop to their full potential.â€￾

To begin that process, U.S. Soccer is using the Development Academy to create a wide-reaching movement within the grassroots soccer environment that will educate parents, coaches and players on the value of expanding national player development directly to the clubs. Using the current U.S. Under-17 Residency Program as a model, the youth clubs chosen to be part of the Development Academy will increase the amount of time spent on meaningful training while also increasing the quality of their matches.

"It's a concept that youth soccer in this country desperately needs and our goal is to truly shift the focus towards increasing player development,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer’s Under-17 National Team head coach John Hackworth. “I think it will create a day-to-day training environment that will allow players the opportunity to develop to the best of their ability. Right now we have only 40 players in that type of environment (at the U-17 Residency Program in Bradenton, Fla.), but this Academy will allow us to put thousands of elite players in a similar environment, which will help us raise the entire level across the nation."

With an emphasis on creating a superior everyday training environment, teams in the Development Academy will have a clean slate for a calendar and will be required to train a minimum of three times a week, eliminating the growing trend of clubs playing an excessive quantity of games in lieu of consistent training patterns. To maintain an emphasis on training, Development Academy teams will compete against other teams in the program and will not play in any other leagues, tournaments or State Cup competitions, and players will only be allowed to compete on their designated Academy team (with exceptions for high school soccer and national team duty).

Clubs that are not part of U.S. Soccer’s Development Academy will continue to play in traditional youth soccer competitions, with the longtime Olympic Development Program also continuing unimpeded. With Development Academy players no longer being seen at ODP events, those spots will now be open for additional players to be seen at an elite level.

"I'm very excited about the establishment of the U.S. Soccer Development Academy Program,â€￾ said U.S. Men’s National Team Head Coach Bob Bradley. “It is very important for U.S. Soccer to work with our top clubs to ensure that our best young players are constantly being challenged in an environment that best promotes player development. With a tremendous amount of reach, this program will help focus training sessions and matches on the areas that are critical to elevating our young players' ability to compete at the elite levels of the sport."

The Development Academy will be divided into regions and will play home and away matches against other Academy teams across a complete season. Each Development Academy region will be comprised of up to 15-20 teams based on geographic proximity, with the winner of each region participating in the annual Academy Finals at The Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif. The Academy clubs will be comprised of Under-16 and Under-18 age groups, with a minimum of 22 players on a roster. Younger players in the Academy system will also be allowed to be play “upâ€￾ within their club.

Clubs will have the opportunity to apply for membership in the Academy program beginning June 1, and teams will be selected by U.S. Soccer’s National Team coaches. U.S. Soccer’s coaches will evaluate prospective clubs on a number of criteria, including a club’s history of elite youth player development and past success in elite competitions. Each Development Academy club will not only serve as a home for many of the nation’s top players, but also as a destination point within their community for shared learning and experience. One of the major advantages of the program will have players receiving integrated oversight from both youth club coaches and U.S. Soccer coaches, while training in their home environment. In turn, the Development Academy will provide an improved scouting environment for college, professional and U.S. National Team coaches.

“After completing an extensive review and discussion across the country, we feel that it is the right time for U.S. Soccer to lead a change in the sport at the youth level,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati. “We need to shift the focus of our young elite players from an ‘overburdened, game emphasis’ model to a ‘meaningful training and competition’ model. This will ultimately lead to more success and will allow players to develop to their full potential.â€￾

To begin that process, U.S. Soccer is using the Development Academy to create a wide-reaching movement within the grassroots soccer environment that will educate parents, coaches and players on the value of expanding national player development directly to the clubs. Using the current U.S. Under-17 Residency Program as a model, the youth clubs chosen to be part of the Development Academy will increase the amount of time spent on meaningful training while also increasing the quality of their matches.

"It's a concept that youth soccer in this country desperately needs and our goal is to truly shift the focus towards increasing player development,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer’s Under-17 National Team head coach John Hackworth. “I think it will create a day-to-day training environment that will allow players the opportunity to develop to the best of their ability. Right now we have only 40 players in that type of environment (at the U-17 Residency Program in Bradenton, Fla.), but this Academy will allow us to put thousands of elite players in a similar environment, which will help us raise the entire level across the nation."

With an emphasis on creating a superior everyday training environment, teams in the Development Academy will have a clean slate for a calendar and will be required to train a minimum of three times a week, eliminating the growing trend of clubs playing an excessive quantity of games in lieu of consistent training patterns. To maintain an emphasis on training, Development Academy teams will compete against other teams in the program and will not play in any other leagues, tournaments or State Cup competitions, and players will only be allowed to compete on their designated Academy team (with exceptions for high school soccer and national team duty).

Clubs that are not part of U.S. Soccer’s Development Academy will continue to play in traditional youth soccer competitions, with the longtime Olympic Development Program also continuing unimpeded. With Development Academy players no longer being seen at ODP events, those spots will now be open for additional players to be seen at an elite level.

"I'm very excited about the establishment of the U.S. Soccer Development Academy Program,â€￾ said U.S. Men’s National Team Head Coach Bob Bradley. “It is very important for U.S. Soccer to work with our top clubs to ensure that our best young players are constantly being challenged in an environment that best promotes player development. With a tremendous amount of reach, this program will help focus training sessions and matches on the areas that are critical to elevating our young players' ability to compete at the elite levels of the sport."

The Development Academy will be divided into regions and will play home and away matches against other Academy teams across a complete season. Each Development Academy region will be comprised of up to 15-20 teams based on geographic proximity, with the winner of each region participating in the annual Academy Finals at The Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif. The Academy clubs will be comprised of Under-16 and Under-18 age groups, with a minimum of 22 players on a roster. Younger players in the Academy system will also be allowed to be play “upâ€￾ within their club.

Clubs will have the opportunity to apply for membership in the Academy program beginning June 1, and teams will be selected by U.S. Soccer’s National Team coaches. U.S. Soccer’s coaches will evaluate prospective clubs on a number of criteria, including a club’s history of elite youth player development and past success in elite competitions.

"The Academy is a comprehensive approach to help develop some of the top players across the nation, but it is also designed to be a working model for the grassroots level,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer Director of Coaching Education & Youth Development Bob Jenkins. “All the clubs involved will be moving in the same direction giving us a similar approach to player development, and then these clubs will act almost like satellites out in the country helping to spread the message out to the clubs around them."

The Academy will also serve as a better coaching development platform, with each participating club receiving two invitations to the U.S. Soccer Development Academy Best Practices seminars. The development platform for U.S. Soccer referees will also be enhanced in the program, with U.S. Soccer assigning referees to all Academy matches.

With the framework of the boys Development Academy serving as a starting point for discussion, a similar initiative to enhance the development of female players will also be explored.

U.S. SOCCER DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY – STRUCTURE

Objective: The focus of the Academy is on player development and providing players with the best possible opportunity to develop to the highest level they are capable of achieving

Standards: A minimum requirement of three training sessions and one rest day per week

Teams: Up to 80 of the top youth soccer clubs in the U.S.

Selection: Clubs will be selected by U.S. Soccer coaches

Age Groups: U-16 & U-18 teams (minimum roster of 22 players); providing opportunities for more than 2,000 players

Competition Format: Divided into regions with each team playing between 30 and 38 home and away matches during an eight-month season. Each region will be comprised of approximately 15-20 teams based on geographic proximity. The winner of each region will play in the Academy Finals at The Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif.

FSM
06-05-2007, 05:43 PM
Here's some more from Top Drawer Soccer: http://topdrawersoccer.com/articles.aspx?article=2405

I've pulled out some of the highlight points, rather than post the entire article.

The Academy Plan
by Robert Ziegler 6/4/2007

Some specific things that stand out regarding the implementation include:

• Academy teams will not be permitted to compete in State Cups, leagues or other tournament, with 4 designated exceptions (Easter week, Christmas/New Year’s Week, Nike Friendlies week and August (but August is mainly a rest period, barring a chance for teams to compete internationally – and then on a one-match-per-day guideline). Players will not be permitted to compete outside of their teams except for high school soccer or a national team.

• Academy team players will not participate in the U.S. Youth Soccer Olympic Development Program, but that program will continue.

• The minimum requirements training sessions are 3 per week, with a requirement of 1 rest day per week.

• 2 coaches from each member club will be included in a yearly Best Practices seminar, at the expense of US Soccer.

• US Soccer will assign referees for all Academy matches, and use the Academy as a platform for referee development.

• The Academy league will be split into 4 regional divisions, with a 30-38 match schedule played over 8 months and some kind of yearly national finals at the Home Depot Center in Carson.

• Academy teams will be fielded in the U16 and U18 age divisions, with 22-player rosters for each.

• Determination on which clubs/teams will comprise the up-to-80-team league/program will be made by national team coaches based on the “qualifications of the clubs.â€￾ The main qualification seems to be a positive assessment from national coaches, as well as previous history of developing top players.

• Fees paid to U.S. Soccer will include a $1 per player and $25 per coach fee. No team or club registration fees are required, but a $2,500 performance bond is mandated (these are typically instituted to ensure participants don’t become casual about their participation in matches). There is no stipulation concerning the clubs charging players to participate, meaning most probably will, at least for starters.

• Each player on a 22-man roster will be required to start at least 30 percent of the team’s matches.

....the USSF “Best Practicesâ€￾ coaching education curriculum will be a centerpiece of the program

"If you are an elite player and under 18 or under 16 and have any kind of desire to develop skill, this program is what you want to be involved in. I don’t think you’ll see ODP go away or any other ID program, they’ll just shift,â€￾ he (John Hackworth, U17 US Men's National Team coach) said. “Across the country, we’ve seen a lot of players and parents have a desire to get something more and to focus completely on player development. ODP is not a day to day development program, it’s about the identification and selection of players and it has served a huge purpose in youth soccer. I just think everyone will have to adjust and figure out how to manage things as they change. I don’t think see programs going away because of it. I just think more and more organizations will need to get in line with the kind of philosophy we’re talking about here.â€￾

The material released by the Federation also emphasized that clubs participating in the Academy will conform their younger age group programs to the standards espoused in Best Practices.

“The idea ultimately is that clubs should run their entire club much more in line with player development principles,â€￾ Hackworth said. “So their U9, or U11 programs should be similar to how we set this up. It will be much different at the competitive level, but it will also be much different from what the competitive level looks like now. We can give these 9 year olds the opportunity to really enjoy the game, to learn it, and have it so they’re not worrying about winning some Halloween tournament and playing 4 full games in 48 hours or something ridiculous like that. So yes, we want to have a profound effect on the clubs’ philosophies on developing players, and that shift in focus will be huge if we are to move forward as a soccer nation.

“So if we’re committed to that we can look at the clubs and say ‘What are you doing with your teams at the youngest ages? Do you have a mini-academy? Are their coaches focused on individual technical development? Are you mixing large player pools instead of focusing on winning U9 and U11 Cups? It’s not rocket science, it’s really pretty simple. Right now that’s not what happens and that’s where we feel it’s right to have some hands on situations with people. We don’t want to see clubs say ‘Let’s just have winning teams until they are 14 and then we’ll turn it over to player development. Let’s focus on development all the way through, and remember that if you develop players as best as you can, you’re going to be successful on the field anyway.â€￾

The Women’s Game

Regarding girls soccer, the Federation announcement simply said a similar initiative will be explored.

The College Game

With college recruiting opportunities being in many ways the mother ship of status quo club soccer, Maryland Men’s head coach Sasho Cirovski made no bones about his endorsement of the move to the academy setup.

“For the good of the game, this is a welcome and long overdue concept. Youth soccer has become obsessed with winning and learning through games at the expense of development of fundamental techniques. The emphasis on training, combined with a periodization schedule that will allow players to train and play games mentally and physically at 100 percent, is exciting,â€￾ Cirovski said in the Federation press release. “It has become increasingly frustrating for all of my colleagues to watch ‘tired’ players, knowing that they are being paced in practices so that they can survive in the games. College coaches will be able to evaluate players in a consistent high quality competitive environment. In the long run, I believe that this will make our recruiting less costly and more efficient. This is something that all of us in college soccer welcome with open arms."

FSM
06-05-2007, 06:02 PM
More: http://images.ussoccer.com/Documents/cm ... lspecs.pdf (http://images.ussoccer.com/Documents/cms/ussf/USSoccerPlayerDevelopment_technicalspecs.pdf)

Onfield details including the following:

Substitutions
Maximum of seven; No-reentry

This accomplishes two things:
1) Ensures coaches are looking at the development
component for players.
2) Allows each player to gain meaningful experience
and playing time.

Playing Time Minimum
Each player must start a
minimum of 30% of the
games

Travel Party 18 players
Allows entire travel party to be eligible to participate.

Roster Changes
Allows for Clubs to “promoteâ€￾ players and replace
players who may want to leave the Academy system.
Up to four changes from
within the Club; New roster
players must be from within
the Club.

Roster Size
22 allows for the Academy team to train in an 11 v.
11 situation. Clubs may have more than 22 players
based on their individual judgment. Developmental
players will be allowed to transfer up age groups
within the Academy program and will not be subject
to minimum start requirements.
Minimum of 22 players; up to
six “developmentalâ€￾ slots on a
game roster

FSM
06-05-2007, 06:06 PM
This Power Point Presentation should be read. It discusses problems of elite youth soccer players and USSF offered solutions:

http://images.ussoccer.com/Documents/cm ... 7-2014.pdf (http://images.ussoccer.com/Documents/cms/ussf/USSoccer_Player_Development_2007-2014.pdf)

FSM
06-07-2007, 01:28 PM
I'm surprise this thread has not generated any kind of comments, because it has produced lots in other forums.

Here is part of one I thought was very interesting because I believe it provides some insight into the decision making that is taking place. It is by a poster associated with the Dallas Texans. The Texans are a Nike Premier Club (like the Bolts and Stars), but were one of the clubs quoted as supporting the National league.

Personally, I like the Nike version a lot better than the Addidas. :cool: The Nike version seems to represent real change with more focus on the training acpects of player development, assuming, of course, it can actually accomplished. The Addidas version just seems more of the same.

At the February 2007 USYSA National convention a "National League" (not Red Bull) is announced. Each of the 4 regions can submit up to 5 teams --12 are selected and the winner gets a spot in USYSA National Championship. This is driven by adidas (it being openly said adidas' $3 million sponsorship of USYSA depends on USYSA agreeing to do this).

2 months later in Portland at the Nike Annual Convention of its Premier Clubs (of which there are 80, hint, hint) this academy league idea is floated. Now, the Nike sponsored USSF backs the play.

Now, we have some notion of a "developmental" league. Players who participate cannot play in the USYSA /adidas sponsored National Championship Series. Or participate in the USYSA ODP program.

I don't know how this is meant to fit in with the MLS youth initiatives, if at all. After all, adidas is the Official MLS Uniform Sponsor. I don't say only Nike clubs will be included, or that they all will be, but the "branding" will make it clear who's boss.

FSM
06-07-2007, 01:44 PM
Here's another interesting comment, this from the president of the Kansas Youth Soccer Association who supports the USYSA National league:

None of the teams (MLS) are putting money in, they are using parents to fund it. As a result combined with pressure from foreign competition, the MLS is potentially losing at least half and probably close to 80% of the market of players.

There is certainly a major drain in Southern California where many young players are going to the MLF (a sports agency that offers player representation and marketing services for international soccer) at 15 or 16, before the MLS can sign them. You also see many foreign clubs coming to the US with programs.

The MLS largely controls the USSF now. How can they staunch this? The MLS does not have the money to make a viable national program. The USSF has the clout to do it and a little money. They can Regionalize it so that teams and games are in MLS areas. This will cut costs for the MLS.

More importantly look at the restrictions. No USYS, US Club, Y League or other program participation except on very select weekends that are targeted at major tournaments. The USSF controls all who enter - no foreign teams or affiliated clubs. (By the way this may violate the USSF's own inter play rules.)

Who benefits from such a program? Who gets to cut out competition for players? Who gets their costs reduced so more players can participate? Who created it?

The only answer to each of those questions is the MLS.

skinny maradona
06-07-2007, 02:04 PM
Youth soccer in the US is a business and you can guarantee that someone somewhere will be benefitting from this. The other thing you can guarantee is that it won't be youth soccer players.
Players that are at a level where a potential professional career is possible will be courted by whoever stands to make money off of them. In other countries that is academies linked to professional teams. It is only recently that people have realized that money can be made by developing and selling US players. Currently top level pro players in the US are owned by MLS so obviously it benefits them to keep as much of the pie for themsleves as possible. All I have read on this so far makes me think it is just more of the same old posturing and attempts to keep others out.
Nothing much will change in the US until the career path of aspiring soccer players has playing professionally at the pinacle instead getting a college scholarship.

FSM
06-07-2007, 02:09 PM
Youth soccer in the US is a business and you can guarantee that someone somewhere will be benefitting from this. The other thing you can guarantee is that it won't be youth soccer players.
Players that are at a level where a potential professional career is possible will be courted by whoever stands to make money off of them. In other countries that is academies linked to professional teams. It is only recently that people have realized that money can be made by developing and selling US players. Currently top level pro players in the US are owned by MLS so obviously it benefits them to keep as much of the pie for themsleves as possible. All I have read on this so far makes me think it is just more of the same old posturing and attempts to keep others out.
Nothing much will change in the US until the career path of aspiring soccer players has playing professionally at the pinacle instead getting a college scholarship.

We parents and our children are just pawns of the system, I guess. :( Which is a good reason to become more savy about the things going on in the world of youth soccer. Or maybe ignorance is bliss. :smt102

Here's another good article by Jim Paglia, a nationally recognized brand strategist who has an extensive background in soccer ranging from the NASL, to NCAA Division I, to World Cup 1994, and 30 years of club administration and coaching.

Thursday, June 7, 2007

Clubs Face Major Transformation

By Jim Paglia
Youth clubs try to generate revenue to support their ambitions by appealing to players whose families are willing to pay higher fees. The competition for players and in some cases, "warm bodies," is exposing a major chink in youth soccer armor.

Club soccer is finding some growth through mergers and acquisitions. That path is likely to reveal that as clubs get larger, they become more like their competition rather than distinctive. Make no mistake - youth soccer is now big business. Some club administrators and directors of coaching have become wealthy from youth soccer. Revenues derived from youth soccer fund real estate acquisitions, indoor facilities, and major sports complexes.

I am not criticizing the fact that people have found ways to profit from their passion. My concern is how the profit motive affects the way clubs evolve. Some "elite" and "premier" teams exist to fuel revenue growth and to cater to parents whose egos insist their child play on a team of distinction.

It is my experience that teams that would have a hard time earning a "B" classification a few years ago are overrunning the highest level of play. Clubs justify the formation and placement of these teams by suggesting that "playing up" as a unit will make them stronger players. They contend the drubbing these teams take against legitimate elite or premier teams is a temporary condition overcome in a couple of years.

The launch of U.S. Soccer Development Academy sounds like a long overdue antidote.

U.S. Soccer Development Academy (USSDA) will rightly segregate the elite players, and provide them a reasonable training schedule. Although I have always been a critic of the Olympic Development Program (ODP) system, the USSDA should open the ranks to more children at the ODP level, and perhaps it will lead to the needed overhaul there.

I anticipate a "trickle down" affect to all this. USSDA is now the elite player territory. Non-USSDA clubs must create an experience that relies on something other than the promise of national prominence. I interact with many club presidents, coaching directors, and key administrators. Repeatedly, they state club goals in two ways - "To compete for national championships," and "To move the club to the 'next level." By today's standards, the "next level" usually means membership enrollment (revenue), won/loss records, and highly paid coaches/trainers.

These goals speak more to coaching and revenue ambitions than to the development of club programs. While many clubs will continue to seek this type of recognition, it will be clear they are doing so without the most elite players.

Revenue drives soccer clubs today despite claims of "for the love of the game." The challenge for any business is running it in a way that distinguishes it from its competition. Leaders of most soccer clubs are finding distinctiveness is not their expertise. They continue to chase the false prophets of "win more" and "recruit better" instead of delivering a unique experience to their members.

USSDA will separate the truly premier clubs from the "want to be." This puts enormous pressure on clubs that are not part of the USSDA program to do a better job of creating a meaningful experience for members who now clearly do not play at the highest level. The majority of players, parents, and volunteers fall into this category.

Clubs that address member satisfaction, and exceed expectations in stakeholder experiences are more likely to survive the shakeout that I predict will occur. Players and parents will express their loyalty to a club's brand for reasons beyond elite status, salaries paid to staff, won/loss records, or trophies acquired.

skinny maradona
06-07-2007, 02:20 PM
USSDA will separate the truly premier clubs from the "want to be." This puts enormous pressure on clubs that are not part of the USSDA program to do a better job of creating a meaningful experience for members who now clearly do not play at the highest level. The majority of players, parents, and volunteers fall into this category.

Clubs that address member satisfaction, and exceed expectations in stakeholder experiences are more likely to survive the shakeout that I predict will occur. Players and parents will express their loyalty to a club's brand for reasons beyond elite status, salaries paid to staff, won/loss records, or trophies acquired.

Isn't this what MPS has been getting flack for?
:) sorry couldn't resist.

The other big problem is the word "development " in ODP. that deceives way too many people. ODP does not develop anyone. It is purely a scouting and identification process and a bad one at that.

06-07-2007, 05:13 PM
I'm also surprised that the USSF proposal hasn't generated any discussion. I find it ironic with all the discussion of MPS and State Cup that no one has even noticed this.

Did anyone miss the part where they propose that the top Boys Clubs in the country no longer participate in ODP or State/Regional/National cups, or any other leagues starting in the Fall of 2007.

From what I've read it seems like a step in the right direction.

Susy Soccer
06-07-2007, 05:54 PM
Yes and, as usual, the girls get left with the second rate system. At least that's the way I read the one line - that it will be explored.

06-07-2007, 07:26 PM
Isn't this what MPS has been getting flack for?
:) sorry couldn't resist.



Dont apologize, you happen to be correct.

FSM
06-16-2007, 11:10 AM
http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewAr ... 57057.html (http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_557057.html)

Federation services
U.S. Soccer Launches Development Academy to Expand Opportunities for Players Nationwide

- Grassroots Development Academy Will Provide Improved Soccer Environment for Thousands of Players, Coaches & Referees from Coast-to-Coast

CHICAGO (June 4, 2007) – In a move designed to improve the development environment for players throughout the country, the U.S. Soccer Federation has taken the initiative in formalizing a nationwide development academy slated to begin in the fall of 2007. The U.S. Soccer Development Academy will begin with up to 80 elite youth soccer clubs from around the country being selected to join the program..............



New England represented with 2 clubs.

http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewAr ... 84743.html (http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_884743.html)

U.S. Soccer Selects First 11 Clubs For Development Academy

- Elite Group of Clubs from Across the Country Represents the First Round of Selections
- Grassroots Development Academy Scheduled for Fall 2007 Kick-off
-Will Provide Improved Soccer Environment for Thousands of Elite Players, Coaches & Referees from Coast-to-Coast

CHICAGO (June 15, 2007) – The first 11 clubs have been chosen for U.S. Soccer’s Development Academy which will start this fall. These 11 elite youth soccer clubs from across the nation are the first group of applicants to be selected by U.S. Soccer’s National Team coaches to participate in the revolutionary program.

The U.S. Soccer Federation has taken the initiative in extending its National Team program and putting an emphasis on the development of the player by improving their daily environment through the nationwide Development Academy, which was originally unveiled on June 4.

The first 11 clubs feature some of the more recognizable names in the youth soccer community, including:

Atlanta Fire United Soccer Association (Georgia)
B/W Gottschee (New York)
CASL – Capitol Area Soccer League (North Carolina)
De Anza Force Soccer Club (Northern California)
FC DELCO (Pennsylvania)
FC Greater Boston Bolts (Massachusetts)
Michigan Wolves (Michigan)
Nomads Soccer Club (Southern California)
Players Development Academy (New Jersey)
Seacoast United (New Hampshire)
FC Westchester (New York)

“It’s been just a little more than a week, and we have been extremely pleased with the quality of applications we have received,â€￾ said U.S. Under-17 Men’s National Team head coach John Hackworth. “We are working with clubs from all over the country to make sure they have the right information and ability to be a part of this initiative.â€￾

Applications continue to come in and are under review with more decisions due in the coming weeks. Created to provide players with the best possible opportunity and environment to develop, the U.S. Soccer Development Academy is being initiated after a comprehensive review of player development systems in the United States and around the world.

“We are very encouraged by the progress so far,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer’s Director of Coaching Education Bob Jenkins. “The key component to the Development Academy is a focus from the clubs on doing what it takes to get their coaches and players focused on long term player development.â€￾

Each Development Academy club will not only serve as a home for many of the nation’s top players, but also as a destination point within their community for shared learning and experience. One of the major advantages of the program will have players receiving integrated oversight from both youth club and U.S. Soccer coaches in their home environment. In turn, the Development Academy will provide an improved scouting environment for college, professional and U.S. National Team coaches.

“After completing an extensive review and discussion across the country, we feel that it is the right time for U.S. Soccer to lead a change in the sport at the youth level,â€￾ said U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati. “We need to shift the focus of our young elite players from an ‘overburdened, game emphasis’ model to a ‘meaningful training and competition’ model. This will ultimately lead to more success and will allow players to develop to their full potential.â€￾

U.S. SOCCER DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY – STRUCTURE

Objective: The focus of the Academy is on player development and providing players with the best possible opportunity to develop to the highest level they are capable of achieving
Standards: A minimum requirement of three training sessions and one rest day per week
Teams: The top youth soccer clubs in the U.S.
Selection: U.S. Soccer coaches will select qualified applicants on a rolling basis until Aug. 1
Age Groups: U-16 & U-18 teams (minimum roster of 22 players); providing opportunities for more than 2,000 players
Competition Format: Divided into regions with each team playing between 30 and 38 home and away matches during an eight-month season. Each region will be comprised of approximately 15-20 teams based on geographic proximity. The winner of each region play in the Academy Finals at The Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif.

FXWLD 24/7
06-16-2007, 07:54 PM
Can a Bolts Boys parent please respond...

Does this mean the Bolts Boys teams (U16-U18) will not play Maple or Region 1 next spring?

Likewise, does this mean Bolts Boys will no longer play ODP?

I'm just wondering if the club will get creative and have A and B teams. "A" teams compete in this new league and "B" teams continue in Maple, etc.

What is the proposed new structure?

I ask because my son plays Div 1 current U15, thanks.

MASoccer
06-16-2007, 08:33 PM
http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewAr ... 57057.html (http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_557057.html)


Competition Format: Divided into regions with each team playing between 30 and 38 home and away matches during an eight-month season. Each region will be comprised of approximately 15-20 teams based on geographic proximity. The winner of each region play in the Academy Finals at The Home Depot Center in Carson, Calif.

30-38 matches over an 8 month period? My guess is that this will require some heavy duty travelling due to weather issues in the northeast. I'm not sure that this will interfere with MAPLE, but it will certainly be a huge commitment for the players during those eight months especially during the summer. What about high school soccer? Any player playing in this league will have some commitment issues and would certainly struggle with the MIAA bona fide team rule.

06-16-2007, 08:40 PM
30-38 matches over an 8 month period? My guess is that this will require some heavy duty travelling due to weather issues in the northeast. I'm not sure that this will interfere with MAPLE, but it will certainly be a huge commitment for the players during those eight months especially during the summer. What about high school soccer? Any player playing in this league will have some commitment issues and would certainly struggle with the MIAA bona fide team rule.

Somewhere in all that material, I believe it indicates these kids will not be playing for any other team, but the academy team and I believe it said that included ODP and high school. Now the question is, are there enough kids who want to make that kind of commitment?

FSM
06-30-2007, 02:04 PM
Update of accepted clubs by region:

East

Seacoast United (New Hampshire)
FC Greater Boston Bolts (Massachusetts)
Oakwood Soccer Club (Connecticut)
B/W Gottschee (New York)
FC Westchester (New York)
Players Development Academy (New Jersey)
FC DELCO (Pennsylvania)

South

CASL – Capitol Area Soccer League (North Carolina)
Greensboro Youth Soccer Club (North Carolina)
Atlanta Fire United Soccer Association (Georgia)
Clearwater Chargers Soccer Club (Florida)
IMG Soccer Academy (Florida)
Kendall Soccer Coalition (Florida)

Central

Vardar (Michigan)
Michigan Wolves (Michigan)
Chicago Magic Soccer Club (Illinois)
Chicago Sockers (Illinois)

West

Crossfire Premier Soccer Club (Washington)
De Anza Force Soccer Club (Northern California)
Nomads Soccer Club (Southern California)
Mustang FC (California)

Unofficially these clubs are also in:

FC Milwaukee
Scott Gallagher
Chicago Fire
KC Wizards
DC United

06-30-2007, 02:31 PM
30-38 matches over an 8 month period? My guess is that this will require some heavy duty travelling due to weather issues in the northeast. I'm not sure that this will interfere with MAPLE, but it will certainly be a huge commitment for the players during those eight months especially during the summer. What about high school soccer? Any player playing in this league will have some commitment issues and would certainly struggle with the MIAA bona fide team rule.

Somewhere in all that material, I believe it indicates these kids will not be playing for any other team, but the academy team and I believe it said that included ODP and high school. Now the question is, are there enough kids who want to make that kind of commitment?

Please take tghe time to read the material. The program starts in November AFTER our high school season is done.

If, as is the case in some other parts of the country, the high school season occurs in the spring, then Academy players will not play HS.

Academy players will not be allowed to be part of the traditional ODP system (unless they are on a National team) because it is redundant-National team coaches are part of the overall academy set up, so participating in the state ODP system is a waste of time.

06-30-2007, 02:32 PM
30-38 matches over an 8 month period? My guess is that this will require some heavy duty travelling due to weather issues in the northeast. I'm not sure that this will interfere with MAPLE, but it will certainly be a huge commitment for the players during those eight months especially during the summer. What about high school soccer? Any player playing in this league will have some commitment issues and would certainly struggle with the MIAA bona fide team rule.

Somewhere in all that material, I believe it indicates these kids will not be playing for any other team, but the academy team and I believe it said that included ODP and high school. Now the question is, are there enough kids who want to make that kind of commitment?

Please take tghe time to read the material. The program starts in November AFTER our high school season is done.

If, as is the case in some other parts of the country, the high school season occurs in the spring, then Academy players will not play HS.

Academy players will not be allowed to be part of the traditional ODP system (unless they are on a National team) because it is redundant-National team coaches are part of the overall academy set up, so participating in the state ODP system is a waste of time.

FSM
07-04-2007, 04:45 PM
USSF has named an additional 10 clubs to the development academy system: http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewAr ... 84743.html (http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_884743.html)

Here's the latest additions, followed by those previously named. Total is now 31 and one might assume the remaining MLS teams will eventually be named. At the present time, California and Texas seem to be hold outs. The issues in So Cal is that the clubs do not want to give up playing in the Coast Soccer League. Haven't heard what the issues are in Texas other than Dallas Texans had been a big supporter of the USYSA National League.

Chicago Fire Soccer Player Development Academy (Illinois) – MLS
Colorado Rush (Colorado)
DC United (District of Columbia) – MLS
New York Red Bulls (New York) – MLS
Potomac Soccer (Maryland)
Real Colorado (Colorado)
Richmond Kickers Soccer Club (Virginia) – USL
Richmond Strikers (Virginia)
VA Rush Soccer Club (Virginia)
Washington Premier FC (Washington)

Atlanta Fire United Soccer Association (Georgia)
B/W Gottschee (New York)
CASL – Capitol Area Soccer League (North Carolina)
De Anza Force Soccer Club (Northern California)
FC DELCO (Pennsylvania)
FC Greater Boston Bolts (Massachusetts)
Michigan Wolves (Michigan)
Nomads Soccer Club (Southern California)
Players Development Academy (New Jersey)
Seacoast United (New Hampshire)
FC Westchester (New York)
Chicago Magic Soccer Club (Illinois)
Clearwater Chargers Soccer Club (Florida)
Crossfire Premier Soccer Club (Washington)
Greensboro Youth Soccer Club (North Carolina)
IMG Soccer Academy (Florida)
Kendall Soccer Coalition (Florida)
Mustang FC (California)
Oakwood Soccer Club (Connecticut)
Sockers F.C. Chicago (Illinois)
Vardar (Michigan)

FXWLD 24/7
07-04-2007, 09:41 PM
So assuming the boy's academy model is successful...The girl's academy can't be far behind.

How would this play out in MA? Which girl's clubs would apply? Would there by more interest on the girl's side than there seems to be on the boy's side?

07-05-2007, 09:39 AM
Can a Bolts Boys parent please respond...

Does this mean the Bolts Boys teams (U16-U18) will not play Maple or Region 1 next spring?

Likewise, does this mean Bolts Boys will no longer play ODP?

I'm just wondering if the club will get creative and have A and B teams. "A" teams compete in this new league and "B" teams continue in Maple, etc.

What is the proposed new structure?

I ask because my son plays Div 1 current U15, thanks.

U16 & U18 teams will play in the Academy set up. No idea, but I assume the U17's will play in the U17 Red Bull league, which has similar teams to the Academy & region 1 Premier League.

If Bolts boys play on the Academy team, they will not be allowed to play for State or Regional ODP. They can participate in National team events if they arte already part of the national pool, or if they are invited by the US Soccer coaches affiliated with the Academy network.

The Bolts will only have one team in the Academy age groups.

The structure can be seen at the US Soccer web site.

FSM
07-05-2007, 09:44 AM
So assuming the boy's academy model is successful...The girl's academy can't be far behind.

How would this play out in MA? Which girl's clubs would apply? Would there by more interest on the girl's side than there seems to be on the boy's side?

I've been wondering the same. I would expect the first thing clubs will have to do is align their coaching staff to meet the requirements.

FSM
07-06-2007, 11:39 AM
Came across the following in my cyber travels:

http://njmg.typepad.com/sbi/2007/07/som ... .html#more (http://njmg.typepad.com/sbi/2007/07/some-interestin.html#more).

Another interesting development is that 11 of the league's 13 teams have already established, or have at least put plans in place, for league-accepted youth systems. Which teams haven't? Toronto FC, which isn't much of a surprise as a new club, and the New England Revolution, which certainly is a surprise. You would think a team who counts U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati as its president (yes, he has both jobs) would at least have a working youth system in place.

Don't think that the Revs aren't being punished for their late start. According to league rules, only teams with established youth systems can sign players from other team's youth systems. Also, the clock for when youth players can officially become designated Homegrown Players for specific clubs doesn't start until the club in question has a program up to snuff. So basically New England is still at least two full years away from being able to sign a youth player it develops. Considering all the benefits of having a system in place you probably shouldn't expect New England to wait too long to start one.

07-06-2007, 11:56 AM
Came across the following in my cyber travels:

http://njmg.typepad.com/sbi/2007/07/som ... .html#more (http://njmg.typepad.com/sbi/2007/07/some-interestin.html#more).

Another interesting development is that 11 of the league's 13 teams have already established, or have at least put plans in place, for league-accepted youth systems. Which teams haven't? Toronto FC, which isn't much of a surprise as a new club, and the New England Revolution, which certainly is a surprise. You would think a team who counts U.S. Soccer president Sunil Gulati as its president (yes, he has both jobs) would at least have a working youth system in place.

Don't think that the Revs aren't being punished for their late start. According to league rules, only teams with established youth systems can sign players from other team's youth systems. Also, the clock for when youth players can officially become designated Homegrown Players for specific clubs doesn't start until the club in question has a program up to snuff. So basically New England is still at least two full years away from being able to sign a youth player it develops. Considering all the benefits of having a system in place you probably shouldn't expect New England to wait too long to start one.

And there's no mention of it on the web site. I have attempted to contact the Revs several times to ask about youth academy programs. I have never received a reply to my phone messages or e-mails.

07-20-2007, 09:24 PM
U.S. Soccer's Development Academy Adds Sixteen More Clubs for the Inaugural Season: http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewAr ... 05635.html (http://www.ussoccer.com/articles/viewArticle.jsp_1605635.html)

AFC Lightning Soccer Club (Georgia)
Arsenal SC (California)
Birmingham United Soccer Association (Alabama)
Carmel United Soccer Club (Indiana)
Empire United Soccer Academy (New York)
FC Milwaukee (Wisconsin)
FC Portland Soccer Academy (Oregon)
Internationals Soccer Club (Ohio)
Irvine Strikers (California)
Metro United Soccer Club (Illinois)
Metropolitan Oval Foundation, Inc. (New York)
North Meck Soccer Club (North Carolina)
Ohio Elite Soccer Academy (Ohio)
PA Classics (Pennsylvania)
Schulz Academy (Florida)
Scott Gallagher (Missouri)

FSM
07-26-2007, 10:11 AM
An article in Soccer New England addressing the plans for a youth academy by the NE Revolution. Sounds like the same plans for a soccer specific stadium.

http://www.soccernewengland.com/

Revs One of Two Teams Lacking Youth Program
By Nick Williams
July 25, 2007

Before the big ticket on July 19 at Denver’s Dick’s Sporting Goods Park – the MLS All-Stars vs. Celtic FC – there was a lesser publicized match on the very same pitch. D.C. United’s Under-17 team squashed Kansas City’s youth team, 3-0, to win the very first SUM U-17 Cup, a youth development tournament featuring the U-17 affiliates of MLS teams.

The inaugural tournament, sponsored by Soccer United Marketing (SUM), featured 12 U-17 teams, including two from the Colorado Rapids and one for every other team except Toronto FC, an expansion side in its first year, and – surprise – the New England Revolution, one of the most successful and established clubs in MLS.

“I wouldn’t say we haven’t done anything yet. We’re looking at it as a long-term project,â€￾ said Brian Bilello, Chief Operating Officer of the Revs. “It’s important for us to get the right program in place first. We’re more concerned with getting the right program and getting it launched in a way we’re comfortable with.â€￾

The youth system in MLS is designed to groom players for the parent clubs. It allows each MLS team to sign two players from its youth team in the first three years of the program and have access to other teams’ prospects that weren’t signed by their clubs.

There’s only one catch: to sign other teams’ unprotected prospects, you need to have a league-accepted youth system.

So how could the Revolution, ultra-competitive in recent years and always on the lookout for cheap talent, not have a youth team in place?

“Our focus is more on the players we develop, not looking toward players other teams developed that they don’t want,â€￾ Bilello said. “I think our primary focus is making sure our program will develop good players for us.

But that still seems to leave the Revolution at a disadvantage, considering the other clubs have gotten a head start on the three-year waiting period to sign players. Once the Revs finally institute a youth system, they’ll be some time behind, shutting them out of a possible source of talent accessible to every other team with a three-year youth system.

“I guess you have to weigh the benefits of getting players other teams’ develop and don’t want versus waiting and having a better system in place…and it’s hard to do that,â€￾ Bilello said. “We might have access to players teams don’t want to protect early, but it might sacrifice having a better program.â€￾

Bilello failed to elaborate on the teams plans, except to say that they, indeed, have some.

“At this point we’re looking at a number of different options,â€￾ he said. “I think we’re looking for [a youth program] that will give us the best chance of success -- we’re not closed off to any ideas.â€￾

How soon they put a program in place remains to be seen. Bilello couldn’t give a timeframe.

“I can’t commit to a time table,â€￾ he said. “But a year or two would be an awful long time. We’ll certainly be getting something up and running before that. We’d like to get it done sooner rather than later.â€￾

07-26-2007, 10:34 AM
An article in Soccer New England addressing the plans for a youth academy by the NE Revolution. Sounds like the same plans for a soccer specific stadium.

http://www.soccernewengland.com/

Revs One of Two Teams Lacking Youth Program
By Nick Williams
July 25, 2007

Before the big ticket on July 19 at Denver’s D!ck’s Sporting Goods Park – the MLS All-Stars vs. Celtic FC – there was a lesser publicized match on the very same pitch. D.C. United’s Under-17 team squashed Kansas City’s youth team, 3-0, to win the very first SUM U-17 Cup, a youth development tournament featuring the U-17 affiliates of MLS teams.

The inaugural tournament, sponsored by Soccer United Marketing (SUM), featured 12 U-17 teams, including two from the Colorado Rapids and one for every other team except Toronto FC, an expansion side in its first year, and – surprise – the New England Revolution, one of the most successful and established clubs in MLS.

“I wouldn’t say we haven’t done anything yet. We’re looking at it as a long-term project,â€￾ said Brian Bilello, Chief Operating Officer of the Revs. “It’s important for us to get the right program in place first. We’re more concerned with getting the right program and getting it launched in a way we’re comfortable with.â€￾

The youth system in MLS is designed to groom players for the parent clubs. It allows each MLS team to sign two players from its youth team in the first three years of the program and have access to other teams’ prospects that weren’t signed by their clubs.

There’s only one catch: to sign other teams’ unprotected prospects, you need to have a league-accepted youth system.

So how could the Revolution, ultra-competitive in recent years and always on the lookout for cheap talent, not have a youth team in place?

“Our focus is more on the players we develop, not looking toward players other teams developed that they don’t want,â€￾ Bilello said. “I think our primary focus is making sure our program will develop good players for us.

But that still seems to leave the Revolution at a disadvantage, considering the other clubs have gotten a head start on the three-year waiting period to sign players. Once the Revs finally institute a youth system, they’ll be some time behind, shutting them out of a possible source of talent accessible to every other team with a three-year youth system.

“I guess you have to weigh the benefits of getting players other teams’ develop and don’t want versus waiting and having a better system in place…and it’s hard to do that,â€￾ Bilello said. “We might have access to players teams don’t want to protect early, but it might sacrifice having a better program.â€￾

Bilello failed to elaborate on the teams plans, except to say that they, indeed, have some.

“At this point we’re looking at a number of different options,â€￾ he said. “I think we’re looking for [a youth program] that will give us the best chance of success -- we’re not closed off to any ideas.â€￾

How soon they put a program in place remains to be seen. Bilello couldn’t give a timeframe.

“I can’t commit to a time table,â€￾ he said. “But a year or two would be an awful long time. We’ll certainly be getting something up and running before that. We’d like to get it done sooner rather than later.â€￾

Interesting, given the other article you posted about this. I can't help but think that there is going to be an eventual collaboration between the Revs & MPS. I don't see the Revs starting a youth academy from scratch, they won't have enough of a history of developing players to get into the US Soccer Academy, and they certainly aren't going to start playing in MAPLE or Super-Y from the very start. Thery will need to align themselves with something that already exists if Biello expects to have something up and running in less than a year or two. Plus, there are connections between the Revs & MPS already in place......

FSM
07-26-2007, 10:37 AM
there are connections between the Revs & MPS already in place......

But there also plenty of connections to the Bolts as well. It will be interesting to see what happens.

JustForFun
07-26-2007, 10:53 AM
I agree with FSM - it will be the Bolts.

JustForFun
07-26-2007, 10:54 AM
I agree with FSM - it will be the Bolts.

JustForFun
07-26-2007, 10:55 AM
I agree with FSM - it will be the Bolts.

FSM
07-26-2007, 10:56 AM
Not to mention connections to Bruno United.

07-26-2007, 10:57 AM
I agree with FSM - it will be the Bolts.

I agree with FSM - it will be the Bolts.

I agree with FSM - it will be the Bolts.

We heard you the first time.

JustForFun
07-26-2007, 11:01 AM
I tried to delete them but FSM replied so quickly I can not delete them (you are not allowed to delete messages that have been replied to). Sorry about that - FSM is a thoroughbred when it comes to posting and has outrun me again!!!!! But does she have the skills to break me down 'one on one'?

07-26-2007, 11:02 AM
there are connections between the Revs & MPS already in place......

But there also plenty of connections to the Bolts as well. It will be interesting to see what happens.

But MPS covers more of the state, and has the SoE. Also has a history in leagues such as Super-Y, W-League, & PDL.

07-26-2007, 01:33 PM
there are connections between the Revs & MPS already in place......

But there also plenty of connections to the Bolts as well. It will be interesting to see what happens.

What are the connections between the Bolts and the Revs

and MPS and the Revs?

07-26-2007, 01:37 PM
there are connections between the Revs & MPS already in place......

But there also plenty of connections to the Bolts as well. It will be interesting to see what happens.

What are the connections between the Bolts and the Revs

and MPS and the Revs?

Revs Head coach Steve Nichol was a player and coach for the Bulldogs.

Revs assistant coach Paul mariner was a Bolts coach.

There's also an Inter connection to the Revs. We can probably find lots of different connections if we turn over enough rocks.

07-26-2007, 01:46 PM
there are connections between the Revs & MPS already in place......

But there also plenty of connections to the Bolts as well. It will be interesting to see what happens.

What are the connections between the Bolts and the Revs

and MPS and the Revs?

Paul Mariner, assistant coach at the Revs, was technical director at the Bolts. John Kerr, Jr. played for the Revolution as did Francis Okaroh, although that connection is obviously gone. John Kerr, Sr was MLS players union representative at one time. Revs GK, Matt Reis, did GK training for the Bolts.

07-26-2007, 02:01 PM
and MPS and the Revs?

I believe two of the owners of the Breakers are MPS guys. Breakers - Revs...2 professional soccer teams so somethings bound to happen. I also believe MPS will be running 'Breakers' camps if/when they start.

One of Tony Dicicio's guys is part of the ownership and Tony will be named coach in a few weeks so you can connect the dots.

07-26-2007, 02:09 PM
and MPS and the Revs?

I believe two of the owners of the Breakers are MPS guys. Breakers - Revs...2 professional soccer teams so somethings bound to happen. I also believe MPS will be running 'Breakers' camps if/when they start.

One of Tony Dicicio's guys is part of the ownership and Tony will be named coach in a few weeks so you can connect the dots.

I know they were trying to get Peter Bradley (MPS) as one of the coaches as well.

pitch420
07-26-2007, 07:43 PM
I know they were trying to get Peter Bradley (MPS) as one of the coaches as well.

That would likely be a no brainer.

07-27-2007, 09:19 AM
Do you really think an existing club would give up that much control and lose their identity? The Revolution (MLS) marketing engine would completely overwhelm any club and egos will be hard to balance. MPS may be different, since they are as much of a sports management operation as a soccer club. MPS would provide the depth and breath that would give the Revolution program an instant operational result.

07-27-2007, 10:22 AM
Crusaders United have given their development program to Paul Turner, outsourced it in a way. Pretty similar arrangement.

07-27-2007, 11:20 AM
Do you really think an existing club would give up that much control and lose their identity? The Revolution (MLS) marketing engine would completely overwhelm any club and egos will be hard to balance. MPS may be different, since they are as much of a sports management operation as a soccer club. MPS would provide the depth and breath that would give the Revolution program an instant operational result.

Yes, MPS structure is the closest match.....

07-27-2007, 04:37 PM
I think, that MPS has been the percieved front runner in an effort to form a youth academy with the Revs. However, two problems exist (and they go each way). First, Revs has no interest on the girls side and this poses a problem for MPS. Second, MPS is probably the third or fourth best boys program in Mass. and the lack of real depth of existing talent within MPS is a problem for the Revs. If the Revs could have combined Juventus and Bolts into a single entity and been allowed to take over their operations I think you would have already seen this happen up here but it is obvious that the Revs have had no desire to jump feet first into the tempest pit that is Mass youth soccer without having a strong and deep talent pool already in place. May still end up being a strategic partnership with MPS - or perhaps the Bolts. Who knows? but everyday that the Revs fail to have a quality development program up and operating is hurting them not now but probably in about 3-5 years when that system starts to reap some rewards for everyone else.

Blue Devil
07-27-2007, 04:53 PM
The Krafts and Revs make very sound decisions most of the time. Isn't the most important thing to get the structure and organization right?

Once that happens wouldn't quality coaches and players who have MLS aspirations gravitate in the direction of the Revs organization without much regard to what the current talent base is?

FSM
07-27-2007, 05:10 PM
Cost will be the determining factor of where players will play. MLS clubs like the Chicago Fire will not charge players and as a result Chicago Magic will charge no fees to participate in their academy program. If the Revs do the same, one can expect most of the top players will flock to the Revs program. I can't believe that implications of this is not being discussed by all involved.

07-28-2007, 06:52 AM
I think, that MPS has been the percieved front runner in an effort to form a youth academy with the Revs. However, two problems exist (and they go each way). First, Revs has no interest on the girls side and this poses a problem for MPS. Second, MPS is probably the third or fourth best boys program in Mass. and the lack of real depth of existing talent within MPS is a problem for the Revs. If the Revs could have combined Juventus and Bolts into a single entity and been allowed to take over their operations I think you would have already seen this happen up here but it is obvious that the Revs have had no desire to jump feet first into the tempest pit that is Mass youth soccer without having a strong and deep talent pool already in place. May still end up being a strategic partnership with MPS - or perhaps the Bolts. Who knows? but everyday that the Revs fail to have a quality development program up and operating is hurting them not now but probably in about 3-5 years when that system starts to reap some rewards for everyone else.

I agree that the talent would flock to the program, whoever it is. If the REvs were to announce a new youth academy structure, where would the players come from? If they are waiting for a talent pool to be concentrated to one or two clubs, then they will likely wait forever.

In addition, Bolts, Juventus, or anyone else have a very finite geographic area that they draw from. I believe the Revs would have player development tights over kids in the entire New England area. Affiliating with the Bolts or Juventus is very limiting. They'd also have to affiliate with clubs like Oakwood, Seacoast, Bruno, Western United, Maine Coast, and Synergy. There's no way to make that work. I think if you look at MPS, they are already drawing players from a wider geographical area that most clubs.

07-28-2007, 09:15 AM
MPS may be drawing from a generally wider tract, but the top teams can typically draw from even wider than that. As right now it would not be uncommon for a limited draw from all over southern New England for a specific top team. My guess is that the Revs will look to partnership with MPS Seacoast and maybe Oakwood at the younger ages and then have their own top teams at U13 and above that take advantage of the best talent developed in the youth academies and as a place that top talent from other "clubs" can land after a recruitment process. Wait until the first time the Revs grab a couple of top players off a U-13 MAPLE/ State Cup Champion!!!

FXWLD 24/7
07-28-2007, 09:20 AM
I think, that MPS has been the percieved front runner in an effort to form a youth academy with the Revs. However, two problems exist (and they go each way). First, Revs has no interest on the girls side and this poses a problem for MPS. Second, MPS is probably the third or fourth best boys program in Mass. and the lack of real depth of existing talent within MPS is a problem for the Revs. If the Revs could have combined Juventus and Bolts into a single entity and been allowed to take over their operations I think you would have already seen this happen up here but it is obvious that the Revs have had no desire to jump feet first into the tempest pit that is Mass youth soccer without having a strong and deep talent pool already in place. May still end up being a strategic partnership with MPS - or perhaps the Bolts. Who knows? but everyday that the Revs fail to have a quality development program up and operating is hurting them not now but probably in about 3-5 years when that system starts to reap some rewards for everyone else.

I agree that the talent would flock to the program, whoever it is. If the REvs were to announce a new youth academy structure, where would the players come from? If they are waiting for a talent pool to be concentrated to one or two clubs, then they will likely wait forever.

In addition, Bolts, Juventus, or anyone else have a very finite geographic area that they draw from. I believe the Revs would have player development tights over kids in the entire New England area. Affiliating with the Bolts or Juventus is very limiting. They'd also have to affiliate with clubs like Oakwood, Seacoast, Bruno, Western United, Maine Coast, and Synergy. There's no way to make that work. I think if you look at MPS, they are already drawing players from a wider geographical area that most clubs.

What is the structure at the other MLS Academys? Did they piggyback off of a club(s)? Or are they more stand alone? They also serve wide geographic areas.

07-28-2007, 09:51 AM
[quote="outside 128":xd7yfak3]I think, that MPS has been the percieved front runner in an effort to form a youth academy with the Revs. However, two problems exist (and they go each way). First, Revs has no interest on the girls side and this poses a problem for MPS. Second, MPS is probably the third or fourth best boys program in Mass. and the lack of real depth of existing talent within MPS is a problem for the Revs. If the Revs could have combined Juventus and Bolts into a single entity and been allowed to take over their operations I think you would have already seen this happen up here but it is obvious that the Revs have had no desire to jump feet first into the tempest pit that is Mass youth soccer without having a strong and deep talent pool already in place. May still end up being a strategic partnership with MPS - or perhaps the Bolts. Who knows? but everyday that the Revs fail to have a quality development program up and operating is hurting them not now but probably in about 3-5 years when that system starts to reap some rewards for everyone else.


I agree that the talent would flock to the program, whoever it is. If the REvs were to announce a new youth academy structure, where would the players come from? If they are waiting for a talent pool to be concentrated to one or two clubs, then they will likely wait forever.

In addition, Bolts, Juventus, or anyone else have a very finite geographic area that they draw from. I believe the Revs would have player development tights over kids in the entire New England area. Affiliating with the Bolts or Juventus is very limiting. They'd also have to affiliate with clubs like Oakwood, Seacoast, Bruno, Western United, Maine Coast, and Synergy. There's no way to make that work. I think if you look at MPS, they are already drawing players from a wider geographical area that most clubs.

What is the structure at the other MLS Academys? Did they piggyback off of a club(s)? Or are they more stand alone? They also serve wide geographic areas.[/quote:xd7yfak3]

If the Rev Academy starts as a standalone Club, would players leave their MAPLE Teams to join?

Would the Academy team play in MAPLE and how would they get in?

Would the Academy team play in State Cups?

Would they be allowed to dual roster and stay with their current Clubs?

If one MAPLE club becomes the becomes the Rev Academy base, would player from other clubs leave to join that Club?

Even if the Academy is focused on boys, wouldn't the Revs want a girls and youth programs for the PR amd marketing value? They could charge for those programs as well.

Every way I look at it, I don't see how an existing MAPLE Club could be partner for this program. MPS seems to make the most sense.

FXWLD 24/7
07-28-2007, 01:23 PM
So I followed up my own post with looking at the websites of the other MLS Youth Academy teams and it occurred to me how arrogant we are in Mass to assume the Revs would need us to implement such a plan. We all know how ridiculously easy it is to start a club in MA. They basically need 20 boys per age group, IMO they don’t need an existing club structure or the geographic map of players at MPS to get started. All clubs in New England will play one role in the MLS Youth Academy: feeder system. Remember when clubs used to tout how many ODP kids they had, well guess what they’ll be touting within the next 12 months. Here is a portion of the original announcement from last November:

“During the next few years, MLS clubs will create teams in up to six age groups. Players on these teams will wear the club's colors and train under the team's coaching staff. Players on MLS youth teams may be able to compete with other youth club teams at various times during the year. MLS youth programs will not jeopardize a player's NCAA eligibility.â€￾

I bolded this comment because it is a win/win for the current boys. They can join the academy, yet remain loyal to the club/team that got them there. In the near future, top-tier boys may bypass club soccer altogether (especially if their parents read this forum first ;) )

07-28-2007, 01:48 PM
From what is happening in other states, it appears that the MLS youth teams are entering the US Soccer Development Academy and will follow the rules as set forth on the US Soccer web site. They also seem to be getting many of the better players as the MLS teams are covering most if not all of the costs associated with the programs.

In Mass, there are a lot of rumors about what the Revs will do. The timing is a problem for this year as most club players have already committed to a team and many have made initial payments. However, if the Revs cover the costs, boys can move and not be hurt financially so long as this all happens soon.

JustForFun
07-29-2007, 08:21 AM
FXWLD 24/7 writes:

They basically need 20 boys per age group, IMO they don’t need an existing club structure or the geographic map of players at MPS to get started.

I agree and disagree. I am in the middle. The Revs would not need the geographic map - players would come to play at the Revs. If the Revs pay then possibly more Urban kids would tryout as well. But I do not think finding kids to play is the most severe problem at the Club management level - it is finding quality coaches. I am not and have not been involved with a Club management board like Fred or Cujo, so temper my opinion. But if the Revs create multiple teams, they will need a coach and coordinator for each team, and overall administrative support. This is why it makes sense to work with the Bolts or others.

Guest writes:

Would the Academy team play in MAPLE and how would they get in?

MAPLE is quickly becoming a Younger age group league. At the older ages the boys do not care about playing MAPLE - they want to play Region 1, or Red Bull, or the Academy league, MAPLE is not of any concern. Look at the rising U17B Bolts team that left to play at the Blazers. The Blazers will not be in MAPLE. Were the 16/17 year old boys concerned? It does not look like it. Look at the rising U15G Stars and Scorpions teams. Did they play in MAPLE last Spring? No, they chose to play in Region 1 and travel to many tournaments. MAPLE was not a concern. MAPLE is a very good Massachusetts league. The Revs will want to play in Region 1, all along the East Coast and even nationally. The Revs will not even consider MAPLE worth discussing, IMHO.

07-29-2007, 12:56 PM
Three MLS Teams Join Development Academy
With one week left for applications, program grows to 50 teams
July 28, 2007
With the August 1 application deadline less than a week away, the U.S. Soccer Federation expects a very competitive final selection process for the last spots in the new U.S. Development Academy.

The Academy recently expanded to 50 clubs with the addition of three MLS teams. Chivas USA, Colorado Rapids and L.A. Galaxy joined D.C. United, Chicago Fire and the New York Red Bulls as MLS participants in the program. The remaining 44 clubs consist of some of the leading youth teams across the nation.

“These additional MLS teams complement an already excellent field of clubs for participation in this program,â€￾ said U.S. Under-17 Men’s National Team head coach John Hackworth. “Based on the quality of the remaining applications under review, we think the quality of the participants for the Development Academy program is outstanding and will provide the foundation for long term improvements for soccer in the United States.â€￾

The program, in its inaugural season, is designed to “shift the focus of the young elite player from an ‘overburdened, game emphasis’ model to a ‘meaningful training and competition’ model.â€￾

07-29-2007, 01:16 PM
Will the Rev's program include both girls and Boys?

07-29-2007, 02:19 PM
I do not think the Revs have a Girls team. I think we can assume it is a Boys league and the feeder program will be Boys as well.

FXWLD 24/7
07-30-2007, 01:46 PM
So assuming the boy's academy model is successful...The girl's academy can't be far behind.

How would this play out in MA? Which girl's clubs would apply? Would there by more interest on the girl's side than there seems to be on the boy's side?

I've been wondering the same. I would expect the first thing clubs will have to do is align their coaching staff to meet the requirements.

Thought I'd ask this question again, given the fact that the girls are now in the Red Bull league, 12 months after the boys program started.

Assume the USSF will be looking for girl's clubs for a November 2008 start. What will the impact be within the current rising U15 girls. Which clubs will apply? Will the girl's flock to it or stay with their existing clubs?

One positive of always following the boys, is at least you see it coming and can plan accordingly.

FSM
08-01-2007, 01:18 PM
I thought this article from soccer New England ought to be included under this topic:

USL Joins with West Ham
Premiership squad looking to come overseas

July 31, 2007
TAMPA, FL – The United Soccer League and West Ham United of the English Premier League will be partnering up, each side declared in a joint announcement made Tuesday in London, England and Tampa, Florida.

West Ham CEO Scott Duxbury and USL’s President Francisco Marcos made the announcement of the partnership, which entails a number of player identification, player exchange, coaching and club development initiatives.

Future initiatives include a West Ham United USA youth academy and professional franchise competing within the USL system to provide North, Central and South American players a corridor to Europe.

“The West Ham USA initiatives are designed to maintain the great traditions of the academy ‘state-side,’â€￾ Duxbury said “The partnership with the USL provides an excellent platform for the development of the program and the West Ham United presence in the United States.â€￾

Some other benefits of the deal include:

West Ham identifying up to twenty youth players from the USL Super Y-League and Super-20 League to attend the West Ham United Academy in London for training and evaluation.

Selected USL coaches will be able to participate in a technical symposium at West Ham United.

West Ham United will actively work with select USL clubs on academy and coaching best practices methodology and select USL youth club teams will be provided access to the West Ham youth academy on official player and coaching development tours.

08-06-2007, 02:39 PM
Pulled from another board:


Something is happening today, August 1, 2007, that is very likely to forever change the course of soccer in America.

Nothing exactly like it has ever been done, either in the US or anywhere else in the world. It's a radical concept that's the product of a soccer visionary who was born and raised in the US.

His name is Brad Friedel.

Sometime this morning, the inaugural class of 24 students will check in, get a room key, unpack their X Box 360, meet their roommate and officially become students at the Premier Soccer Academy in Lorain Ohio.

Among the kids enduring the "Welcome to PSA" speeches even as you read this are Romain Gail, a 12 year old forward from Herndon Virginia with a first touch that has been described as "not from this planet", Joseph-Claude Gyau from Silver Springs Maryland, a lightning fast flanker who can get around just about anyone with a first step that comes out of nowhere.
and Ohio's own Wil Trapp, a wildly gifted one-touch center mid who lit up the 2007 Mundialito in Bolivia.

They, along with 14 other American kids and seven from overseas (Brazil, Chile, Bolivia, Venezuela), are part of a bold experiment in soccer development because, lest you think this is just another ex-jock using his name to run a glorified soccer camp, consider:

Among the major investors in PSA are adidas and Underarmor. And we're not talking a couple bags of free balls here; they're into this for around $12 million which, among other things, has bought them this:

http://premiersocceracademies.com/May2007AcademyW.jpg


It's the 30,000 square foot main building which contains dormitories, classrooms and the cafeteria, and including a workout facility which a lot of colleges would kill for.

And this is in addition to the 3 1/2 outdoor professional grade fields, one of them synthetic (the half field is exclusively for keeper training) and, oh yes, the full size, FIFA regulation indoor field, complete with locker rooms, trainers facilities and wired meeting rooms where each touch of the ball is instantly available for video review.

"So OK", you're saying, "that's just great. Another fancy-shmansy soccer school for rich kids. What's a year at this place going to set their parents back?"

Well, being the intrepid reporter that I am, I have your answer right here:

Nothing.

Not a dime. Ever. From anyone. Regardless of how rich your Daddy got from trading derivatives and cocoa futures, you can't buy your way in. PSA has, among other items in their $1.5 million staff salary budget, guys who are out there looking for you. Over the last year, players have been identified, brought into "ID camps", brought back to "Elite camp" in June and then, if you make the cut, offered a spot.

Nobody asks if you can pay. Nobody cares.

Eventually they will have around 50 players aged 13-18 and field two teams, a U14 and a U16 which will each play upwards of 40 games a year, many of them overseas.

You guys want "development"? Well Brad's got "development". In the future, there are a number of possibilities, including accepting players sent by professional teams who will pay the cost of attendance and retain the player's rights.

But for now, up there on 20 acres just down the road from Lake Erie, something exciting is going on today.

And don't you just wish you were there?

pitch420
08-06-2007, 02:42 PM
Me ^

MASoccer
08-06-2007, 03:16 PM
Pulled from another board:


http://premiersocceracademies.com/May2007AcademyW.jpg



I have heard a lot of positives regarding this Academy. It has been compared to Bradenton and the clubs that have placed players at this Academy highlight it as just that. The number one reason that I believe this program is going to succeed is because it is free. My argument has always been that the current ODP programs are severely flawed because they are not available to ALL players due to economic and travel constraints. This is also my biggest critiscism of the USSF Development Academy. When the US adopts a European model of not charging players to play and develop we will finally be on the right track.

FXWLD 24/7
08-06-2007, 09:10 PM
MA Soccer-

Is the Academy pot being stirred again?

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 08:22 AM
Light summer reading. The beginning of all of the environment discussions

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 09:09 AM
Interesting how many people signed in.

-- Pathfinder
"Ban Perspective"

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 09:12 AM
Someone really has some time on his hand to be digging back in the archives 7 years.

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 10:41 AM
seriously people ...please let this ancient thread die and save us from yet another ridiculous mud slinging contest

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 10:49 AM
seriously people ...please let this ancient thread die and save us from yet another ridiculous mud slinging contest

You are very naive. New, old, doesn't matter. The poster will be here day and night pushing his agendas tomorrow, the next day, in 6 months, in two years, etc just like he always. It won't stop until enough people make clear that they are tired of it and can demonstrate that he is seriously hurting his own cause. Good luck with that. He can find out that a bunch of parents from his own club are complaining to the club about his behavior and he doesn't bat an eye. Just keeps pounding away, as relentless and vicious as ever. It's not going to stop, but it's certainly not going to stop if people allow him to threaten others and if they directly or indirectly continue to defend what he is doing. He essentially is defecating on the board with vicious, resentful intentions literally every single day.

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:12 PM
You are very naive. New, old, doesn't matter. The poster will be here day and night pushing his agendas tomorrow, the next day, in 6 months, in two years, etc just like he always. It won't stop until enough people make clear that they are tired of it and can demonstrate that he is seriously hurting his own cause. Good luck with that. He can find out that a bunch of parents from his own club are complaining to the club about his behavior and he doesn't bat an eye. Just keeps pounding away, as relentless and vicious as ever. It's not going to stop, but it's certainly not going to stop if people allow him to threaten others and if they directly or indirectly continue to defend what he is doing. He essentially is defecating on the board with vicious, resentful intentions literally every single day.

The intellectual police have spoken. We can't talk about this simply because they don't like the ideas being expressed in the thread and don't agree that it is important to discuss.

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:15 PM
The intellectual police have spoken. We can't talk about this simply because they don't like the ideas being expressed in the thread and don't agree that it is important to discuss.

No worries. You will keep talking about it. Perhaps the only thing that is an absolute certainty.

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:22 PM
sorry, don't consider myself nave...just tired of hoping to find and engage in some positive, helpful, useful conversation about soccer and the morons keep dragging everyone down into the sh*thole once again..I am not taking sides as to who is to blame as there is plenty to go around

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:24 PM
What in the world could you possibly find so objectionable about this topic. This thread started with the announcement of the formation of DAP and gives some pretty interesting insight into why we got to where we are now. The thing I find myself asking is now seven years later why isn't there a true girls DAP? Is that because DAP is somehow viewed to be a failed experiment? One thing is pretty clear that US Club is radically changing the club environment for both genders so I would think the DAP clubs might be looking over their shoulders trying to estimate if there might be any fall out with what they are doing.

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:25 PM
You are very naive. New, old, doesn't matter. The poster will be here day and night pushing his agendas tomorrow, the next day, in 6 months, in two years, etc just like he always. It won't stop until enough people make clear that they are tired of it and can demonstrate that he is seriously hurting his own cause. Good luck with that. He can find out that a bunch of parents from his own club are complaining to the club about his behavior and he doesn't bat an eye. Just keeps pounding away, as relentless and vicious as ever. It's not going to stop, but it's certainly not going to stop if people allow him to threaten others and if they directly or indirectly continue to defend what he is doing. He essentially is defecating on the board with vicious, resentful intentions literally every single day.

What would we do without you? Do you ever think about the number of hours you spend on this site? Life is short and at the end of it, you will look back and say, "I am sure glad I was the protector of the truth on TS"

That is a life well worth living. Your family must be proud.

-- Pathfinder

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:25 PM
What in the world could you possibly find so objectionable about this topic. This thread started with the announcement of the formation of DAP and gives some pretty interesting insight into why we got to where we are now. The thing I find myself asking is now seven years later why isn't there a true girls DAP? Is that because DAP is somehow viewed to be a failed experiment? One thing is pretty clear that US Club is radically changing the club environment for both genders so I would think the DAP clubs might be looking over their shoulders trying to estimate if there might be any fall out with what they are doing.

Take a day off! Or at least get a job!

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:33 PM
Perhaps we need to somehow merge this thread with the National League thread. Things appear to be changing so fast I am at a loss, there is so much to absorb. Here is some of the latest. Some are speculating this could eliminate such things as ODP and State Cups.


I haven't reread this entire thread, but this part certainly appears to be true.

Unregistered
06-24-2014, 12:47 PM
I haven't reread this entire thread, but this part certainly appears to be true.

Yes, isn't revisiting the past amusing. If I remember correctly, FSM was a Stars parent. She basically got harassed off this site by the cyberbullies but she sure did bring some real interesting things to discuss.